Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am new to Django and Celery. I have been reading the doc and searching but cannot seem to find a straight answer:

Can you cancel an already executing task? (as in the task has started, takes a while, and half way through it needs to be cancelled)

I found this from the doc at Celery FAQ

>>> result = add.apply_async(args=[2, 2], countdown=120)
>>> result.revoke()

but I am unclear if this will cancel queued tasks or if it will kill a running process on a worker. Thanks for any light you can shed!

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 51 down vote accepted

revoke cancels the task execution. If a task is revoked, the workers ignore the task and do not execute it. If you don't use persistent revokes your task can be executed after worker's restart.

http://docs.celeryproject.org/en/latest/userguide/workers.html#worker-persistent-revokes

revoke has an terminate option which is False by default. If you need to kill the executing task you need to set terminate to True.

>>> from celery.task.control import revoke
>>> revoke(task_id, terminate=True)

http://docs.celeryproject.org/en/latest/userguide/workers.html#revoking-tasks

share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly the explanation I was looking for, thank you! –  dcoffey3296 Jan 19 '12 at 13:04
    
Does this work in a distributed env? I mean if I have workers on multiple machines that are executing tasks. Does celery keep track of which machine the task is executing on? –  ksrini Mar 27 '13 at 13:55
    
It does. The communication with workers takes place via the broker. –  0x00mh Mar 28 '13 at 17:46
    
result.revoke(terminate=True) should do the same thing as revoke(task_id, terminate=True) –  CamHart Jul 15 '14 at 0:59
    
this doesn't work, the script will keep running –  user299709 Aug 4 '14 at 5:23

In Celery 3.1, the API of revoking tasks is changed.

According to the Celery FAQ, you should use result.revoke:

>>> result = add.apply_async(args=[2, 2], countdown=120)
>>> result.revoke()

or if you only have the task id:

>>> from proj.celery import app
>>> app.control.revoke(task_id)
share|improve this answer

See the following options for tasks: time_limit, soft_time_limit (or you can set it for workers). If you want to control not only time of execution, then see expires argument of apply_async method.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.