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I am messing around with C# and am making a prototype GUI (with no game attached, just messing around with buttons and button colors). I'm running into an error:

private void temperValue_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        int temperInt = 23;
        temperInt = Convert.ToInt32(temperValue.Text);

        if (temperInt >= 70)
        {
            temperButton.BackColor = System.Drawing.Color.Red;
        }
        else if (temperInt >= 40 & <= 69)
        {
            temperButton.BackColor = System.Drawing.Color.DarkOrange;
        }
    }

On the "else if" line, I have an error from both the "<=" and the "69)". The "<=" error is "Invalid expression term '<='", and the four errors for the "69)" is ") expected", "Invalid expression term ')'", and two "; expected" errors.

There are no variables outside of this snippet of code that are affecting this code. Every variable called is defined inside the snippet.

(For anyone curious, "temper" stands for "Temperature")

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Isn't checking for <= 69 redundant? If it's made it to the else then it must be 69 or smaller. –  Jeremy Wiggins Jan 19 '12 at 4:02
2  
In addition to the correct answers: it is also more clear to the reader if you write the code like this: if (40 <= x && x <=69) because that emphasizes lexically that x is between them. –  Eric Lippert Jan 19 '12 at 4:31

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You cannot take shortcuts in your boolean conditions like that.

else if (temperInt >= 40 & <= 69)

Must instead be written as:

else if (temperInt >= 40 && temperInt <= 69)

Note that when making boolean comparisons, you usually want to use the double ampersand &&. This causes shoct-circuiting (only evaluate both sides if the left side succeeds) which is usually what is wanted. And as I said, you need to include the temperInt identifier both times -- you can't say "where some variable is greater than one value and less than another" like in a SQL BETWEEN clause.

Update: Fixed answer per Eric's suggestion.

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Might I ask: What is the difference between the two? (I mean what does the extra ampersand do. I know it's there) –  h3half Jan 19 '12 at 3:45
    
&& is logical AND and & is a bitwise AND –  Keith Nicholas Jan 19 '12 at 3:47
1  
Two ampersands is for comparing boolean values. One ampersand is for bitwise manipulation. (Same is true for the | operator) –  Kirk Woll Jan 19 '12 at 3:48
3  
@h3half: The last paragraph of this answer is incorrect. It is not the case that & and | may not be used for Booleans. It is perfectly legal; try it! The difference is that | always evaluates both halves. The || skips evaluating the right half if the left half is true. Similarly for && -- if the left half is false then the right half is not evaluated. But it is simply false to say that the operators do not apply to bools; they certainly do. –  Eric Lippert Jan 19 '12 at 4:26
    
@KeithNicholas and Kirk Wolf: I encourage you to read section 7.11.3 of the C# 4 specification. –  Eric Lippert Jan 19 '12 at 4:34
if (temperInt >= 40 & <= 69) ...

is not valid C#. Computer languages are a little more restrictive than natural languages. You should use:

if (temperInt >= 40 && temperInt <= 69) ...

(you'll notice I'm also using the logical && operator rather than the bitwise & operator - the former is for truth values, the latter usually for bit manipulation, see this answer for details).

There's another alternative, the use of extension methods:

bool IsBetween (this int me, int lower, int upper) { 
    return (me >= lower) && (me <= upper); 
}

if (temperInt.IsBetween (40, 69)) ...

which is closer to natural language, but that's probably overkill for this case.

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you probablly meant temperInt >= 40 && temperInt <= 69

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else if (temperInt >= 40 & <= 69)

Should be:

else if (temperInt >= 40 && temperInt <= 69)

You need to include the variable in both parts of the statement, and & is a bitwise AND whereas && is a logical AND which is what you want in this case.

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There are a few errors in the given code.

 else if (temperInt >= 40 & <= 69)
    {
        temperButton.BackColor = System.Drawing.Color.DarkOrange;
    }

This should actually read

 else if (temperInt >= 40 && temperInt <= 69)
    {
        temperButton.BackColor = System.Drawing.Color.DarkOrange;
    }

The && is the logical AND operator in C# and not the '&'. Also the LHS part need to be used in all equality comparisons and not chained like your code sample.

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