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In Python, how to list all characters matched by POSIX extended regex [:space:]?

Is there a programmatic way of extracting the Unicode code points covered by [:space:]?

[EDIT1]: Solution summarized in GitHub.

[EDIT2]

#!/usr/bin/env python2.7
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-

##

# * Not very fast!
# * c.f. help(unichr) for range limit 0x10ffff
#
# * unicodeChars = [unichr(c) for c in range(0x10ffff+1)]
# has runtime error
# ValueError: unichr() arg not in range(0x10000) (narrow Python build)
# because of 'narrow Python build'

# unicodeChars = [unichr(c) for c in range(0x10ffff+1)]


import sys

print sys.maxunicode
# --> 65535 = 0xFFFF = 2^16-1

# define unicode plane 1 characters
unicodeChars = u''.join(unichr(c) for c in xrange(sys.maxunicode+1))

str = ''.join(unicodeChars)

import re
# example if we wanted things matching `\s` with `re` module:
whitespaceChars = re.findall('\s', str, re.UNICODE)

from unicodedata import name
for c in whitespaceChars:
    print repr(c), name(c, '')
# --> [u'\t', u'\n', u'\x0b', u'\x0c', u'\r', u' ']

# If i had the regex module...
# import regex
# spaceCharacters = regex.findall("[[:space:]]", str)
# print spaceCharacters
share|improve this question
    
Are you using a specific module? \s matches ` \t\n\r\f\v`. –  charlax Jan 19 '12 at 5:23
    
What do you need this information for? If it's just curiosity, you can grep the Unicode database for all characters matching the whitespace property. The Python unicodedata module sadly doesn't offer a facility for enumerating or iterating over a set of code points, certainly not by property. –  tripleee Jan 19 '12 at 8:04
    
@Problemaniac, the github link is broken –  BiGYaN Apr 25 '14 at 5:22
1  
@BiGYaN I added code explicitly. –  qazwsx Apr 25 '14 at 21:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Using a generator instead of a list comprehension, and xrange instead of range:

>>> s = u''.join(unichr(c) for c in xrange(0x10ffff+1))
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <genexpr>
ValueError: unichr() arg not in range(0x10000) (narrow Python build)

Whoops: in general use sys.maxunicode.

>>> s = u''.join(unichr(c) for c in xrange(sys.maxunicode+1))
>>> import re
>>> re.findall(r'\s', s)
[u'\t', u'\n', u'\x0b', u'\x0c', u'\r', u' ']

Whoops: Ummm what about "no-break space" etc?

>>> re.findall(r'\s', chrs, re.UNICODE)
[u'\t', u'\n', u'\x0b', u'\x0c', u'\r', u'\x1c', u'\x1d', u'\x1e', u'\x1f', u' '
, u'\x85', u'\xa0', u'\u1680', u'\u180e', u'\u2000', u'\u2001', u'\u2002', u'\u2
003', u'\u2004', u'\u2005', u'\u2006', u'\u2007', u'\u2008', u'\u2009', u'\u200a
', u'\u2028', u'\u2029', u'\u202f', u'\u205f', u'\u3000']

What is all that stuff? unicodedata.name is your friend:

>>> from unicodedata import name
>>> for c in re.findall(r'\s', chrs, re.UNICODE):
...     print repr(c), name(c, '')
...
u'\t'
u'\n'
u'\x0b'
u'\x0c'
u'\r'
u'\x1c'
u'\x1d'
u'\x1e'
u'\x1f'
u' ' SPACE
u'\x85'
u'\xa0' NO-BREAK SPACE
u'\u1680' OGHAM SPACE MARK
u'\u180e' MONGOLIAN VOWEL SEPARATOR
u'\u2000' EN QUAD
u'\u2001' EM QUAD
u'\u2002' EN SPACE
u'\u2003' EM SPACE
u'\u2004' THREE-PER-EM SPACE
u'\u2005' FOUR-PER-EM SPACE
u'\u2006' SIX-PER-EM SPACE
u'\u2007' FIGURE SPACE
u'\u2008' PUNCTUATION SPACE
u'\u2009' THIN SPACE
u'\u200a' HAIR SPACE
u'\u2028' LINE SEPARATOR
u'\u2029' PARAGRAPH SEPARATOR
u'\u202f' NARROW NO-BREAK SPACE
u'\u205f' MEDIUM MATHEMATICAL SPACE
u'\u3000' IDEOGRAPHIC SPACE
share|improve this answer

It'd be a bit hard as Python doesn't support POSIX character classes.

The PyPI regex module does, however (you have to install it yourself).

The only way I can think of to extract all unicodes that match [[:space:]] is a bit ugly:

  • generate a string of all unicode characters
  • match against [[:space:]].

I'm sure there's a better way to generate stri (the string of all unicode characters) in my code below, so open to improvement there!

chrs = [unichr(c) for c in range(0x10ffff+1)] # <-- eww that's not very fast!
# also we go up to 0x10ffff (inclusive) because that's what help(unichr) says.
stri = ''.join(chrs)

import re
# example if we wanted things matching `\s` with `re` module:
re.findall('\s',stri)
# --> [u'\t', u'\n', u'\x0b', u'\x0c', u'\r', u' ']

# If i had the regex module...
# regex.findall("[[:space:]]",stri)

(edit - modified variable name from str to stri to avoid overwriting the in-built str module(!))

share|improve this answer
    
How not to hard code range(0x10ffff+1)? –  qazwsx Jan 19 '12 at 7:00
    
Then where would you like the range to end? It's problematic in that not all code points in the range are valid, though. –  tripleee Jan 19 '12 at 8:29
    
Well, help(unichr) says unichr(i) valid for 0 <= i <= 0x10ffff so there's no issue that it's hard-coded. The only qualm I have is that it seems a waste to spend ages generating a list only to convert it into a flat string, and the generation of the list (chrs) seems to take a noticeable second or two - I just wonder if there's an equivalent of string.ascii_letters for unicode. –  mathematical.coffee Jan 19 '12 at 23:57

[ \t\r\n\v\f] or \s do that. Notice the space in the beginning.

Wikipedia (finally up) is pretty helpful.

share|improve this answer
1  
I think OP wants a list of all unicode characters that would be matched by \s –  tzaman Jan 19 '12 at 5:23

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