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I want to have an abstract class Server with an abstract method called Initialize that passes a reference to IConnection, by reference. From there, a class deriving from this should be able to essentially specialize the IConnection object with its implementation of Initialize. This is fine except that I want to also have two abstract methods: DataSent and DataReceived and I want to use the specialized type in their signature, perhaps through generics.

Something like this is what I want:

public override void Initialize(ref IConnection connection)
{
    connection = new MySpecialConnection(connection);
}

public override void DataSent(MySpecialConnection connection, byte[] data)
{

}

public override void DataReceived(MySpecialConnection connection, byte[] data)
{

}

Is there an easy way to do this? I've been playing around with generics for the better portion of a few days and nobody I have spoken with online has been able to come up with a solution.

For those of you who think you see the solution: when I tried doing this with generics it was pretty complex and due to variance problems it was just not wanting to work right.

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The connection in Initialize() appears to be a property. Is it necessarily be distinguishable from the parameter connection of DataSent() and DataReceived()? –  Alex R. Jan 19 '12 at 5:41
    
It does not have to be, but for ease of use it should be. Otherwise, you will end up having to "as" cast out of the IConnection to the more specialized type if you want any of the state information. The idea is to move away from state tokens like in SocketAsyncEventArgs.UserToken and specialize the entire type to represent the state of the connection. –  Michael J. Gray Jan 19 '12 at 5:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why not just this?

abstract class Server<T> where T : IConnection
{
    public abstract void Initialize(ref IConnection conn);
    public abstract void DataSent(T conn, byte[] data);
    public abstract void DataReceived(T conn, byte[] data);
}

class SpecialServer : Server<SpecialConnection>
{
    public override void Initialize(ref IConnection conn)
    {
        conn = new SpecialConnection(conn);
    }

    public override void DataSent(SpecialConnection conn, byte[] data)
    {
        //things
    }

    public override void DataReceived(SpecialConnection conn, byte[] data)
    {
        //stuff
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I was being silly and had a variance modifier stuck in an awkward place in my code. I guess when in doubt, write it all again! I feel awfully dumb now :) –  Michael J. Gray Jan 19 '12 at 12:39
    
@MichaelJ.Gray That's okay. I felt really dumb writing this because I thought I was missing something in the question. –  takteek Jan 20 '12 at 1:46

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