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Is it possible to unset (clean or un-instantiate) an object of a class by executing code of that particular class?

My scenario is one that, for some reason, I reach a point that the object has no meaning to exist anymore, so I want to make sure that is will not be used again by killing its reference in memory.

Here is a snippet example:

class Foo {
    public $bar = "doh!";
    function destroy() {
        // ???    
    }
}
$o = new Foo();
echo $o->bar . '\n';
$o->destroy();
echo $o->bar . '\n'; // I expect an error here...

If I do a "unset" command outside the class code, it works, obviously:

$o = new Foo();
unset($o);
echo $o->bar . '\n'; // PHP Notice:  Undefined property: Foo::$bar in ...

But I tried to do it inside the "destroy" method, by calling "unset", or creating a custom "__destruct", but none worked.

Any ideas are very welcome.

Cheers,

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what did you unset, can you write the exact line.. –  Shamim Hafiz Jan 19 '12 at 6:27
    
possible duplicate of php - unset $this –  John Flatness Jan 19 '12 at 6:49
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4 Answers 4

Take into account that you can't explicitly destroy an object.

The ways to allow PHP Garbage Collector to act upon an object are:

$var = null; // set to null
unset($var); // unset

The object will stay there. However, if you unset the object and your script pushes PHP to the memory limits, the objects not needed will be garbage collected. I would go with unset() as it seams to have better performance (not tested but documented on one of the comments from the PHP official manual).

That said do keep in mind that PHP always destroys the objects as soon as the page is served. So this should only be needed on really long loops and/or heavy intensive pages.

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Using unset can never lead to better performance. It is always faster to not call the function rather than call it –  zerkms Jan 19 '12 at 6:31
    
@zerkms unless your script is so memory intensive it will, at some point, require to clean up during execution. On that particular scenario... unset should be used. Nevertheless if you don't need it, you shouldn't use it as it will NOT speed things up. –  Frankie Jan 19 '12 at 6:33
    
"unless your script is so memory intensive it will, at some point, require to clean up during execution" --- this all is about the fact that otherwise script will just not work at all. Using unset to free some memory != using unset to make the script faster. –  zerkms Jan 19 '12 at 6:39
    
@zerkms agreed. But I'm confused, does the OP refer to speed? And on my question I do say "this should only be used on... etc". –  Frankie Jan 19 '12 at 6:42
    
Performance isn't only about speed, but also about computer resources consumption ;) –  meze Jan 19 '12 at 6:44
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What's wrong with unset($o)? You could wrap that behaviour up in a static class method if it really offends you:

class Foo {
    public static function destroy(&$foo) {
        unset($foo);
    }
}
Foo::destroy($o);
share|improve this answer
    
It won't work. unset in this case just removes one reference, not the object itself. But probably $foo = null; would do the work –  zerkms Jan 19 '12 at 6:29
    
The idea is that there is a particular situation in which the object should cease to exist, but this decision was taken by the code that lies in the class itself... so the point is that you do not know that you should kill the object from the instantiated object's perspective. –  bruno.braga Jan 19 '12 at 6:29
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It's impossible. You can unset a variable or set it to null but there's no guarantee that you won't have any references to this object ($b = $o; $b won't be destroyed with unset($o);).

An ugly solution is add a field in your class, e.g. destroyed, check in every method that it's not true and throw an exception if it is.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Yeah, it seems impossible to achieve... another dirty way could be:

class Foo {
    public $bar = "doh!";
    function destroy() {
        unset($this->bar); // and do this for EVERY property of this class
    }
}
$o = new Foo();
echo $o->bar . '\n';
$o->destroy();
echo $o->bar . '\n'; // PHP Notice:  Undefined property: Foo::$bar in...

However, the object would still exists, and methods would still be accessible.

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