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How do you trace the path of a Breadth-first search such that in the following example:

If searching for key 11, return the shortest list connecting 1 to 11.

return [1,4,7,11]
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11  
Why does this feel like homework? –  Peter Rowell Jan 19 '12 at 6:55
1  
It was actually an old assignment I was helping a friend on months ago, based on the Kevin Bacon Law. My final solution was very sloppy, I basically did another Breadth-first search to "rewind" and backtrack. I wan't to find a better solution. –  Christopher Markieta Jan 19 '12 at 6:58
6  
Excellent. I consider revisiting an old problem in an attempt to find a better answer to be an admirable trait in an engineer. I wish you well in your studies and career. –  Peter Rowell Jan 19 '12 at 17:14
1  
Thanks for the praise, I just believe if I don't learn it now, I will be faced with the same problem again. –  Christopher Markieta Jan 20 '12 at 6:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 55 down vote accepted
+50

You should have look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breadth-first_search first.

Below is a quick implementation, in which I used a list of list to represent the queue of paths.

# graph is in adjacent list representation
graph = {
        '1': ['2', '3', '4'],
        '2': ['5', '6'],
        '5': ['9', '10'],
        '4': ['7', '8'],
        '7': ['11', '12']
        }

def bfs(graph, start, end):
    # maintain a queue of paths
    queue = []
    # push the first path into the queue
    queue.append([start])
    while queue:
        # get the first path from the queue
        path = queue.pop(0)
        # get the last node from the path
        node = path[-1]
        # path found
        if node == end:
            return path
        # enumerate all adjacent nodes, construct a new path and push it into the queue
        for adjacent in graph.get(node, []):
            new_path = list(path)
            new_path.append(adjacent)
            queue.append(new_path)

print bfs(graph, '1', '11')

Another approach would be maintaining a mapping from each node to its parent, and when inspecting the ajacent node, record its parent. When the search is done, simply backtrace according the parent mapping.

graph = {
        '1': ['2', '3', '4'],
        '2': ['5', '6'],
        '5': ['9', '10'],
        '4': ['7', '8'],
        '7': ['11', '12']
        }

def backtrace(parent, start, end):
    path = [end]
    while path[-1] != start:
        path.append(parent[path[-1]])
    path.reverse()
    return path


def bfs(graph, start, end):
    parent = {}
    queue = []
    queue.append(start)
    while queue:
        node = queue.pop(0)
        if node == end:
            return backtrace(parent, start, end)
        for adjacent in graph.get(node, []):
            parent[adjacent] = node # <<<<< record its parent 
            queue.append(adjacent)

print bfs(graph, '1', '11')

EDIT: the above codes are based on the assumption that there's no cycles.(thanks to @roberking).

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1  
This is excellent! My thought process lead me to believe in creating some type of table or matrix, I have yet to learn about graphs. Thank you. –  Christopher Markieta Jan 19 '12 at 7:04
    
I also tried using a back tracing approach although this seems much cleaner. Would it be possible to make a graph if you only know the start and the end but none of the nodes in-between? Or even another approach besides graphs? –  Christopher Markieta Jan 19 '12 at 7:19
    
@ChristopherM I failed to understand your question :( –  qiao Jan 19 '12 at 7:30
    
If we know the start node is "1" and the end node is "11" but the other nodes are unknown until we begin to search them; such that the graph is dynamic and will still work even if the tree had 100 nodes. For ex: { '1': [a, b, c], a: [d, e], d: [f, g], c: [h, i], h: [11, k] } –  Christopher Markieta Jan 19 '12 at 7:45
    
@ChristopherM As long as the adjacent nodes are being determined when a node is reached, then the above algorithm will be fine. –  qiao Jan 19 '12 at 8:01

I thought i'd try code this up for fun:

graph = {
        '1': ['2', '3', '4'],
        '2': ['5', '6'],
        '5': ['9', '10'],
        '4': ['7', '8'],
        '7': ['11', '12']
        }

    def bfs(graph,for_front,end):
        #assumes no cycles.
        next_for_front=[(node,path+','+node) for i,path in for_front if i in graph for node in graph[i]]
        for node,path in next_for_front:
            if node==end:
                return path
        else:
            return bfs(graph,next_for_front,end)

    print bfs(graph,[('1','1')],'11')

    #>>>
    #1,4,7,11

if you want cycles you could add this:

for i,j in for_front: #allow cycles, add this code
        if i in graph:
            del graph[i]
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2  
+1, you reminded me of one thing: assume no cycles :) –  qiao Jan 19 '12 at 8:35
    
Where would you add this piece of code? –  Liondancer Dec 3 '13 at 13:25
    
after you have built the next_for_front. A follow on question, what if the graph contains loops? E.g. if node 1 had an edge connecting back to itself? What if the graph has multiple edges going between two nodes? –  robert king Dec 3 '13 at 21:33

I liked qiao's first answer very much! The only thing missing here is to mark the vertexes as visited.

Why we need to do it?
Lets imagine that there is another node number 13 connected from node 11. Now our goal is to find node 13.
After a little bit of a run the queue will look like this:

[[1, 2, 6], [1, 3, 10], [1, 4, 7], [1, 4, 8], [1, 2, 5, 9], [1, 2, 5, 10]]

Note that there are TWO paths with node number 10 at the end.
Which means that the paths from node number 10 will be checked twice. In this case it doesn't look so bad because node number 10 doesn't have any children.. But it could be really bad (even here we will check that node twice for no reason..)
Node number 13 isn't in those paths so the program won't return before reaching to the second path with node number 10 at the end..And we will recheck it..

All we are missing is a set to mark the visited nodes and not to check them again..
This is qiao's code after the modification:

graph = {
    1: [2, 3, 4],
    2: [5, 6],
    3: [10],
    4: [7, 8],
    5: [9, 10],
    7: [11, 12],
    11: [13]
}


def bfs(graph_to_search, start, end):
    queue = [[start]]
    visited = set()

    while queue:
        # Gets the first path in the queue
        path = queue.pop(0)

        # Gets the last node in the path
        vertex = path[-1]

        # Checks if we got to the end
        if vertex == end:
            return path
        # We check if the current node is already in the visited nodes set in order not to recheck it
        elif vertex not in visited:
            # enumerate all adjacent nodes, construct a new path and push it into the queue
            for current_neighbour in graph_to_search.get(vertex, []):
                new_path = list(path)
                new_path.append(current_neighbour)
                queue.append(new_path)

            # Mark the vertex as visited
            visited.add(vertex)


print bfs(graph, 1, 13)

The output of the program will be:

[1, 4, 7, 11, 13]

Without the unneccecery rechecks..

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