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I want to remove all 'N's from the data that looks like this:

>Seq1
NNNNNNNNA
NNNNNNNNN
ATCGGGGGG
NNNNNNNNN
GTCGGGGGG
>Seq2
GATAAAAAA
NNNNNNNNN

So that it returns:

>Seq1
AATCGGGGGGGTCGGGGGG
>Seq2
GATAAAAAA

But why this doesn't do it:

sed -e 's/N//g' 

What's the correct way to approach this?

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You want to remove the newline also or only the N's ? –  Raghuram Jan 19 '12 at 7:24
    
@Raghuram: also newline. –  neversaint Jan 19 '12 at 7:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's my Perl solution:

perl -pe 'if (!/^>/) { tr/N\n//d } elsif ($. > 1) { $_ = "\n$_" }' input-file
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Nice and clean! –  neversaint Jan 19 '12 at 7:49
    
You are missing a newline on the last line. –  potong Jan 19 '12 at 20:04

Use:

sed ':a;N;$!ba;s/[N\n]//g'

[N\n] matches on either the Ns or the new lines. The rest is taken from this question on StackOverflow.

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ah I'm more familiar with perl and didn't know, sed needs special handling to join the lines +1 –  Hachi Jan 19 '12 at 7:33
1  
It seemed odd to me too. –  Ilion Jan 19 '12 at 7:34
    
@llion: thanks. But not quite what I want. It puts everything into single line. While what I want is to maintain '>Seq' as its header. See example. –  neversaint Jan 19 '12 at 7:36
    
@neversaint: do you want the first line untouched or do you want special handling for any pattern in the header? –  Hachi Jan 19 '12 at 7:41

This might work for you:

sed '/>Seq/{:a;x;s/N//g;s/\n//2gp;g;x;d};H;$ba;d' file
>Seq1
AATCGGGGGGGTCGGGGGG
>Seq2
GATAAAAAA

or this:

sed ':a;$!{N;ba};s/[N\n]//g;s/>Seq[0-9]*/\n&\n/g;s/.//' file
>Seq1
AATCGGGGGGGTCGGGGGG
>Seq2
GATAAAAAA
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Simple awk should do the trick -

awk '!/^N+/' filename

Test:

[jaypal:~/Temp] cat temp
>Seq1
NNNNNNNNA
NNNNNNNNN
ATCGGGGGG
NNNNNNNNN
GTCGGGGGG
>Seq2
GATAAAAAA
NNNNNNNNN

[jaypal:~/Temp] awk '!/^N+/' temp
>Seq1
ATCGGGGGG
GTCGGGGGG
>Seq2
GATAAAAAA
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you need '\n' to match the newline characters:

sed -e 's/[N\n]//g'

if this doesn't do what you want, please show us, what it does and explain whats different to what you want

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