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I have two queries, the only difference being the GROUP BY clause

SELECT * FROM `packages_sorted_YHZ` WHERE `hotel_city` = 'Montego Bay'
ORDER BY  `deal_score` DESC 
LIMIT 0,3;

SELECT * FROM `packages_sorted_YHZ` WHERE `hotel_city` = 'Montego Bay'
GROUP BY `hotel_name`
ORDER BY  `deal_score` DESC
LIMIT 0,3;

The first query returns the first result with a deal_score of 75 but the second query returns the first result with the deal_score of just 72.

I would have thought that regardless of the GROUP BY clause, the first result would have the highest deal score possible (75)

The purpose of the GROUP BY clause is to optionally select a unique hotel_name for each result. Does anyone know what I'm doing wrong here.

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Normally your do not apply GROUP BY one_or_few_columns on queries in which you SELECT *. –  Salman A Jan 19 '12 at 8:02
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Without being able to look at all the data, my best guess is that Group By is merging the data and giving you an arbitrary value that matches the Where clause. This will happen if hotel name isn't unique, and you won't be given the maximum score unless you specifically query for it.

Try putting a Max() around deal_score. In MySQL, Group By can be used way too easily, I like how MSSQL enforces the use of aggregate functions and grouping by every field that isn't aggregated. Try this query:

SELECT `hotel_name`, MAX( `deal_score` ) AS `max_score` FROM `packages_sorted_YHZ` WHERE `hotel_city` = 'Montego Bay'
GROUP BY `hotel_name`
ORDER BY  `max_score` DESC
LIMIT 0,3;
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This answer was slightly closer to the solution as the ORDER BY max_score was correct. I also needed to add all the fields individually instead of selecting *. Thank you –  Andy Gee Jan 19 '12 at 8:38
    
@AndyGee No problem. –  Andrew Jackman Jan 19 '12 at 8:42
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It looks like you are facing some very MySql specific issue. In theory, your second query is not valid and should return an error. But MySQL allows for selection of so called hidden columns - the columns that are not mentioned in a group by clause and not aggregated.

As stated in manual, hidden columns values are indeterminate, but in practice it usually picks up the first row walking the index used, regardless of sorting specified by ORDER BY, as sorting is performed after the grouping.

This is vendor-specific issue, so your second query should always fail if used to query other RDBMS. The correct implementation should be something like

SELECT max(`deal_score`) as maxdeal, `hotel_name` FROM `packages_sorted_YHZ` WHERE `hotel_city` = 'Montego Bay'
GROUP BY `hotel_name`
ORDER BY maxdeal
LIMIT 0,3;
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1  
+1, but to be more specific, the first met record walking through the used index. –  newtover Jan 19 '12 at 8:07
    
@newtover, thanks, updated the post. –  J0HN Jan 19 '12 at 8:11
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You should not use GROUP BY but instead DISTINCT since you want a unique hotel_name.

example:

SELECT DISTINCT hotel_name -- add other fields here
FROM `packages_sorted_YHZ` 
WHERE `hotel_city` = 'Montego Bay'
ORDER BY  `deal_score` DESC
LIMIT 0,3;
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SELECT max(deal_score) as maxdealscore, `hotel_name` * FROM `packages_sorted_YHZ` WHERE `hotel_city` = 'Montego Bay'
GROUP BY `hotel_name`
ORDER BY  `deal_score` DESC
LIMIT 0,3;
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