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How can I call an external command (as if I'd typed it at the Unix shell or Windows command prompt) from within a Python script?

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hey here's a good tutorial on integrating python with shell: dreamsyssoft.com/python-scripting-tutorial/shell-tutorial.php – Triton Man Mar 19 '15 at 3:46
2  
@TritonMan: it is not a good tutorial. Use for line in proc.stdout: (or for line in iter(proc.stdout.readline, '') in Python 2) instead of (moronic) for line in proc.stdout.readlines():. See Python: read streaming input from subprocess.communicate() – J.F. Sebastian Jun 12 '15 at 18:41

39 Answers 39

Here are my 2 cents: In my view this is best practice when dealing with external commands...

This is return values from execute method...

pass, stdout, stderr = execute(["ls","-la"],"/home/user/desktop")

This is execute method...

def execute(cmdArray,workingDir):

    stdout = ''
    stderr = ''

    try:
        try:
            process = subprocess.Popen(cmdArray,cwd=workingDir, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE, bufsize=1)
        except OSError:
            return [False, '', 'ERROR : command(' + ' '.join(cmdArray) + ') could not get executed!']

        for line in iter(process.stdout.readline, b''):

            try:
                echoLine = line.decode("utf-8")
            except:
                echoLine = str(line)

            stdout += echoLine

        for line in iter(process.stderr.readline, b''):

            try:
                echoLine = line.decode("utf-8")
            except:
                echoLine = str(line)

            stderr += echoLine

    except (KeyboardInterrupt,SystemExit) as err:
        return [False,'',str(err)]

    process.stdout.close()

    returnCode = process.wait()
    if returnCode != 0 or stderr != '':
        return [False, stdout, stderr]
    else:
        return [True, stdout, stderr]
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For python 3.5+ it is recommended that you use the [run function from the subprocess module][1]. This returns a CompletedProcess object, from which you can easily obtain the output as well as return code.

from subprocess import PIPE, run

command = ['echo', 'hello']
result = run(command, stdout=PIPE, stderr=PIPE, universal_newlines=True)
print(result.returncode, result.stdout, result.stderr)
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I quite like shell_command for its simplicity. It's built on top of the subprocess module.

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Use subprocess.call:

from subprocess import call

# using list
call(["echo", "Hello", "world"])

# single string argument varies across platforms so better split it
call("echo Hello world".split(" "))
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Using Popen function of subprocess python module is the simplest way of running linux commands. In that, Popen.communicate() function will give your commands output. For example

import subprocess

..
process = subprocess.Popen(..)   # pass command and arguments to the function
stdout, stderr = process.communicate()   # get command output and error
..
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The subprocess module described above by Eli is very powerful, but the syntax to make a bog-standard system call and inspect its output, is unnecessarily prolix.

The easiest way to make a system call is with the commands module (Linux only).

> import commands
> commands.getstatusoutput("grep matter alice-in-wonderland.txt")
(0, "'Then it doesn't matter which way you go,' said the Cat.")

The first item in the tuple is the return code of the process. The second item is its standard output (and standard error, merged).


The Python devs have 'deprecated' the commands module, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't use it. Only that they're not developing it anymore, which is okay, because it's already perfect (at its small but important function).

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6  
Deprecated doesn't only mean "isn't developed anymore" but also "you are discouraged from using this". Deprecated features may break anytime, may be removed anytime, or may dangerous. You should never use this in important code. Deprecation is merely a better way than removing a feature immediately, because it gives programmers the time to adapt and replace their deprecated functions. – Misch Apr 19 '13 at 8:07
2  
Just to prove my point: "Deprecated since version 2.6: The commands module has been removed in Python 3. Use the subprocess module instead." – Misch Apr 19 '13 at 8:14
    
It's not dangerous! The Python devs are careful only to break features between major releases (ie. between 2.x and 3.x). I've been using the commands module since 2004's Python 2.4. It works the same today in Python 2.7. – Colonel Panic Apr 23 '13 at 16:09
6  
With dangerous, I didn't mean that it may be removed anytime (that's a different problem), neither did I say that it is dangerous to use this specific module. However it may become dangerous if a security vulnerability is discovered but the module isn't further developed or maintained. (I don't want to say that this module is or isn't vulnerable to security issues, just talking about deprecated stuff in general) – Misch Apr 23 '13 at 16:23

I would recommend the following method 'run' and it will help us in getting STDOUT, STDERR and exit status as dictionary; The caller of this can read the dictionary return by 'run' method to know the actual state of process.

  def run (cmd):
       print "+ DEBUG exec({0})".format(cmd)
       p = subprocess.Popen(cmd, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE, universal_newlines=True, shell=True)
       (out, err) = p.communicate()
       ret        = p.wait()
       out        = filter(None, out.split('\n'))
       err        = filter(None, err.split('\n'))
       ret        = True if ret == 0 else False
       return dict({'output': out, 'error': err, 'status': ret})
  #end
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In windows you can just import subprocess module and run external commands by calling subprocess.Popen(), subprocess.Popen().communicate() and subprocess.Popen().wait() as below:

# Python script to run a command line
import subprocess

def execute(cmd):
    """
        Purpose  : To execute a command and return exit status
        Argument : cmd - command to execute
        Return   : exit_code
    """  
    process = subprocess.Popen(cmd, shell=True, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE)
    (result, error) = process.communicate()

    rc = process.wait() 

    if rc != 0:
        print "Error: failed to execute command:", cmd
        print error 
    return result
# def

command = "tasklist | grep python"
print "This process detail: \n", execute(command)

Output:

This process detail:
python.exe                     604 RDP-Tcp#0                  4      5,660 K
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import subprocess

p = subprocess.Popen("df -h", shell=True, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE).communicate()[0]
print p.split("\n")

Gives nice output which is easier to work with

['Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on',
 '/dev/sda6        32G   21G   11G  67% /',
 'none            4.0K     0  4.0K   0% /sys/fs/cgroup',
 'udev            1.9G  4.0K  1.9G   1% /dev',
 'tmpfs           387M  1.4M  386M   1% /run',
 'none            5.0M     0  5.0M   0% /run/lock',
 'none            1.9G   58M  1.9G   3% /run/shm',
 'none            100M   32K  100M   1% /run/user',
 '/dev/sda5       340G  222G  100G  69% /home',
 '']
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protected by Martijn Pieters Apr 16 '13 at 20:23

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