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How can I reset the auto-increment of a field? I want it to start counting from 1 again.

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4  
You may get a better response on the site for DBAs at dba.stackexchange.com –  Rowland Shaw Jan 19 '12 at 8:40
15  
You'll probably want to empty the table too: TRUNCATE TABLE yourTableName; –  Konerak Jan 19 '12 at 8:41
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possible duplicate of MySQL: Reorder/Reset auto increment primary key? –  outis Jan 20 '12 at 7:09
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yes, truncate table is best in this case. it also reset auto increment start to 1. –  raidsan Jun 3 '13 at 10:07
    
Sometimes you don't have permission to TRUNCATE as that requires DROP permissions. –  Luke Cousins Nov 14 '14 at 10:23

10 Answers 10

up vote 576 down vote accepted

You can reset the counter with:

ALTER TABLE tablename AUTO_INCREMENT = 1

For InnoDB you cannot set the auto_increment value lower or equal to the highest current index. (quote from ViralPatel):

Note that you cannot reset the counter to a value less than or equal to any that have already been used. For MyISAM, if the value is less than or equal to the maximum value currently in the AUTO_INCREMENT column, the value is reset to the current maximum plus one. For InnoDB, if the value is less than the current maximum value in the column, no error occurs and the current sequence value is not changed.

See How to Reset an MySQL AutoIncrement using a MAX value from another table? on how to dynamically get an acceptable value.

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4  
This can take forever for a filled up table. Be careful with this: stackoverflow.com/questions/2681869/… –  B T Aug 3 '12 at 21:11
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this is a circular reference –  Besnik Feb 21 '13 at 11:00
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Hah and here I am again using Google for this solution. How's it going, 4 months ago me? –  James Huckabone Mar 8 '13 at 6:18
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Oh the irony of this being the first result on Google for "mysql auto increment reset" :D –  Doorknob Jun 18 '13 at 21:06
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Bear in mind that MySql will create a new table, with the same structure and new auto_increment value and copy all records from the original table, drop the original and rename the new one. This could have a considerable performance impact (and disk space) on production environments if the table is large. –  Rostol Sep 9 '13 at 20:18
ALTER TABLE tablename AUTO_INCREMENT = 1
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How this command will work without giving the table name? –  Praveen Srinivasan Apr 3 at 9:25
    
@PraveenSrinivasan "table" was a table name, I changed it to "tablename" though –  boobiq Apr 4 at 19:55
    
May I know what is the difference between your answer and the previous answer –  Praveen Srinivasan Apr 6 at 4:41
    
@PraveenSrinivasan no difference, we added them at the same time –  boobiq Apr 6 at 10:31

Simply like this:

ALTER TABLE tablename AUTO_INCREMENT = value;

reference: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/alter-table.html

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1  
reset means to set it to the default value ... so you can replace "value" by 1 –  Besnik Feb 21 '13 at 11:02

There are good options given in How To Reset MySQL Autoincrement Column

Note that ALTER TABLE tablename AUTO_INCREMENT = value; does not work for InnoDB

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7  
Do you how to do this with InnoDB? –  EmptyArsenal Dec 13 '13 at 23:49
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It does work on InnoDB, at least on MySQL 5.1.73. –  Eduardo Sep 26 '14 at 14:21
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Works fine for me using MySQL v 5.6.2 –  Eddie B Sep 27 '14 at 20:32
    
I had a similar issue where an autoincrement field wasn't getting reset after I deleted records from a table. TRUNCATE appears to have worked. I think the solutions below for removing autoincrement and then re-applying may help alleviate this. –  CraigM Jan 7 at 21:38

The best solution that worked for me:

ALTER TABLE my_table MODIFY COLUMN ID INT(10) UNSIGNED;
COMMIT;
ALTER TABLE my_table MODIFY COLUMN ID INT(10) UNSIGNED AUTO_INCREMENT;
COMMIT;

Its fast, works with innoDB, and I don't need to know the current maximum value! This way the auto increment counter will reset and it will start automatically from the maximum value exists.

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enter image description hereThere is a very easy way with phpmyadmin under the "operations" tab, you can set, in the table options, autoincrement to the number you want.

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The highest rated answers to this question all recommend "ALTER yourtable AUTO_INCREMENT= value". However, this only works when value in the alter is greater than the current max value of the autoincrement column. According to the MySQL documentation:

You cannot reset the counter to a value less than or equal to any that have already been used. For MyISAM, if the value is less than or equal to the maximum value currently in the AUTO_INCREMENT column, the value is reset to the current maximum plus one. For InnoDB, you can use ALTER TABLE ... AUTO_INCREMENT = value as of MySQL 5.0.3, but if the value is less than the current maximum value in the column, no error occurs and the current sequence value is not changed.

In essence, you can only alter AUTO_INCREMENT to increase the value of the autoincrement column, not reset it to 1, as the OP asks in the second part of the question. For options that actually allow you set the AUTO_INCREMENT downward from its current max, take a look at MySQL: Reorder/Reset auto increment primary key?.

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SET  @num := 0;

UPDATE your_table SET id = @num := (@num+1);

ALTER TABLE your_table AUTO_INCREMENT =1;

I think this will do it

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2  
This question already has an appropriate answer. Further, your UPDATE will update all values in id column. –  Kermit May 4 '14 at 16:24
    
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The OP doesn't state they are re-ordering existing rows. –  Kermit May 4 '14 at 20:13
ALTER TABLE news_feed DROP id

ALTER TABLE news_feed ADD  id BIGINT( 200 ) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT FIRST ,ADD PRIMARY KEY (id)

I used this in some of my scripts , the id field is droped and then added back with previous settings , all the existent fields within the database table are filled in with new auto increment values , this should also work with InnoDB .

Note that all the fields within the table will be recounted and will have other ids !!!.

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I suggest you to go to Query Browser and do the following:

  1. Go to schemata and find the table you want to alter.
  2. Right click and select copy create statement.
  3. Open a result tab and paste the create statement their.
  4. Go to the last line of the create statement and look for the Auto_Increment=N, (Where N is a current number for auto_increment field.)
  5. Replace N with 1.
  6. Press ctrl+enter.

Auto_increment should reset to one once you enter new row int the table.

I don't know what will happen if you try to add a row where an auto_increment field value already exist.

Hope this help!

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protected by Kermit May 4 '14 at 16:23

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