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I am using isNan functionto check if entered value is a number:

if(isNaN(num)) {
    alert('I am not a number');
}
else {
//
     }

However, if entered value is, for example, "5748hh" it is understandable like a number and return false. What is wrong?

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2  
You need to correctly close your parenthesis in this example :) You're missing a closing ) after num). –  Eirinn Jan 19 '12 at 8:42
    
isNaN("5748hh") === true; What's not working? –  Raynos Jan 19 '12 at 8:49
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7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

from Mozilla MDN

When the argument to the isNaN function is not a number, the value is first coerced to a number. The resulting value is then tested to determine whether it is NaN. Thus for non-numbers that when coerced to numeric type result in a valid non-NaN numeric value (notably the empty string and boolean primitives, which when coerced give numeric values zero or one), the "false" returned value may be unexpected; the empty string, for example, is surely "not a number." The confusion stems from the fact that the term, "not a number", has a specific meaning for numbers represented as IEEE-794 floating-point values. The function should be interpreted as answering the question, "is this value, when coerced to a numeric value, an IEEE-794 'Not A Number' value?"

so alert(isNaN('45345ll')) returns true because its value coercion is different than a parseInt/parseFloat conversion.

e.g.

var num = false;
console.log(isNaN(num));        /* return false because the coerced value is 0 but */
console.log(parseInt(num, 10)); /* return isNaN */

Maybe you get an unexpected value due to a missing paren in your if statement

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In my Firebug:

>>> isNaN("5748hh")
true
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isNaN = is Not a Number, so if it returns true the data inputted is not a number.

http://jsfiddle.net/8fMAr/

if(isNaN("5748hh"))
{
    alert("not a number");
}
else
{
    alert("a number");   
}

Returns true: "not a number", like it should.

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You must try to parse it first:

if(isNaN(parseInt(num, 10))) {

According to the documentation:

Since the very earliest versions of the isNaN function specification, its behavior for non-numeric arguments has been confusing. When the argument to the isNaN function is not a number, the value is first coerced to a number. The resulting value is then tested to determine whether it is NaN. Thus for non-numbers that when coerced to numeric type result in a valid non-NaN numeric value (notably the empty string and boolean primitives, which when coerced give numeric values zero or one)

Unlike parseInt() this coerced to a number will result in Not a Number for string like 5748hh and hence the behavior you see.

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3  
This actually returns a valid number 5748 from string "5478hh". –  zvona Jan 19 '12 at 8:43
    
@zvona the OP said "5748hh" it is understandable like a number so from this I understood the sample string should give back the number 5748. –  Shadow Wizard Jan 19 '12 at 8:50
    
@ShadowWizard a coercion is different than a conversion so 5748aais not coerced as a number and it don't give back a number. see my example below –  Fabrizio Calderan Jan 19 '12 at 9:14
    
@ShadowWizard, true indeed. I missed that line and understood OP wanted the opposite. –  zvona Jan 19 '12 at 10:03
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if you parse a string that starts with a number it will successfully parse into the number, with the remainder of the string ignored. e.g. parseInt('56sadfh', 10) will parse into 56. If you want to prevent this you should use a regex to check the input instead. e.g.

if (!num.match(/[0-9]+/)) {
  alert("not a number");
}
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Use +'56sadfh' –  Raynos Jan 19 '12 at 8:48
    
@Raynos I don't understand your comment. What do you mean? –  Matt Fellows Jan 19 '12 at 10:38
1  
parseInt('56sadfh', 10) === 56, +'56sadfh' is NaN thus isNan(+'56sadfh') works –  Raynos Jan 19 '12 at 10:59
    
I didn't say it didn't work... I was advocating a completely different approach to checking the validity of a number. –  Matt Fellows Jan 19 '12 at 15:03
    
I'm advocating that +str is far more elegant then str.match(regex) –  Raynos Jan 19 '12 at 15:04
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I tried it and it gives me true.

alert(isNaN("123hh"));  // - alert true.

see this JSfiddler

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isNaN("5748hh"); returns true.

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