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I'm trying to tidy all my css code on my site, I want to be able to be specific with the type. Let's say the type will be 20px, bold and blue e.g.

<h1 bold blue>Hello world</h1 blue bold>

So the css file will have:

h1 {
font-size:20px;
}

bold {
font-weight:bold:
}

blue {
color:blue;
}

Then as I go through my design process i can mix and match with colors and sizes etc. Is something like this possible?

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1  
You can do this with classes, but it's hardly (read: never) a good idea to pollute your markup with decorative attributes and classes. –  BoltClock Jan 19 '12 at 9:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

this isn't possible exaclty like you want to, but what you can do is this:

<h1 bold blue>Hello world</h1 blue bold> // your idea
<h1 class="bold blue">Hello world</h1>   // correct html, even slightly shorter

and

h1 {
  font-size:20px;
}

.bold {                                  // added . for being a class
  font-weight:bold:
}

.blue {                                  // added . for being a class
  color:blue;
}

css-variables itself are possible when using something like lesscss, but this works in another way than the one you mentioned and your html-markup still has to be valid.

EDIT:
please note that, as edem (and others) said, using blue and bold as classnames in a real project isn't a good idea. i assumed you just gave this as short examples to ask for how to combine different "sets of css-rules" (read: classes). if thats not the case: stick to edems or tims explanation and take a look at guides for "semantical markup".

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Not good. See my explanation below. –  Adam Arold Jan 19 '12 at 9:02
    
@edem: you're absolutely right, but i assumed blue and bold are just short examples to clearify he want's to combine different classes - maybe i should have mentioned that. –  oezi Jan 19 '12 at 9:09
    
Never mind, I cancelled the downvote. –  Adam Arold Jan 19 '12 at 9:17
    
+1 for "even slightly shorter". I totally agree with edem and tim-medora, but this example is both clear and simple. –  MC Emperor Jan 19 '12 at 9:21

Colors rarely make good identifiers. Suppose "blue" is no longer blue? Maybe you want it to be red instead?

Font-weights ("bold" in your example) also are not good identifiers. Perhaps in the future you may prefer a font which looks better with a normal font-weight.

Determine the purpose of the style (e.g. article byline, or picture caption) and/or the semantic purpose of the element to which it is being applied, and name your styles accordingly.

You can then use a combination of classes (as others have mentioned) to achieve your desired goal.

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There is the point. –  Adam Arold Jan 19 '12 at 9:02

This is against good practices. Let's say you have an article header type which can be found on any article page and a main header which is on every page:

.mainHeader {
   font-size:20px;
   font-weight:bold:
   color:blue;
}

.articleHeader {
   font-size:15px;
   font-weight:bold:
   color:red;
}

What if some day you decide that your article header won't be blue any more. If you change

.blue {
  color:blue;
}

to

.blue {
    color:red;
}

that wont'be good. You should name your classes/ids according to their semantical purpose.

The point is that CSS supposed to be succint so you can change the looks of your whole page with modification in 1-2 lines. The idea you present here is not succint therefore not considered a good practice.

I think you should use less css as the answer suggested above. By the way if you use some scripting language on your webpage like python or php you can use a template engine which supports inheritance and you can generate your own css code and you can use variables there. This simply does not fit in CSS alone.

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+1 for explaining why semantical markup is important. –  oezi Jan 19 '12 at 9:59

Yes. Use classes.

<h1 class"bold blue">Hello world</h1>

h1 {font-size:20px;}

.bold {
    font-weight:bold:
}

.blue {
    color:blue;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Using .bold or .blue is not a good practice since it can change to some other color / font type at any time if you decide that it does not look good any more and in that case .blue {color:red} is not so meaningful. –  Adam Arold Jan 19 '12 at 9:00

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