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I have an image that is 1024x1024 and is divided into 4 quadrants: image with four quadrants

I would like to shrink this image down such that quadrant 2 is 256x256 and mask out, or hide, the other 3 quadrants such that it is only visible on the page. Like this:

resized masked image

How can this be done? Is it possible with pure CSS or is js needed along the way?

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Assuming the browsers you're targetting (FF4+, IE9+, Safari 4.1+ Chrome 3+) can use the background-size CSS property, then you can do this in CSS alone:

.bg {
    background-image: url(http://i.stack.imgur.com/HQaif.jpg);
    background-repeat: no-repeat;    
    background-size: 203%;
    background-position: top left; 
    width: 256px;
    height: 256px;  
}

If you remove the red keyline between each section then the size property can be made 512px and it would make the calculation easier, should you need to resize again in future.

Example fiddle

More information on background-size

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Very interesting. It would, however be good to support IE8 I would suppose as well. Do you have a js adaptation that would help that aspect out; otherwise this is a really clean solution. –  ylluminate Jan 19 '12 at 9:04
    
You could use Modernizr (modernizr.com) which is a javascript library which adds CSS3 and HTML5 features (including background-size) to older browsers. –  Rory McCrossan Jan 19 '12 at 9:07
    
Super news, thanks. So simply including modernizr should do the trick or do I need to take any additional steps for this to work properly on, particularly, ie8? –  ylluminate Jan 19 '12 at 9:17
    
IIRC you just need to add the script to your page. The documentation will have full installation instructions though. –  Rory McCrossan Jan 19 '12 at 9:20
    
I have a twist to this now. It turns out that the background-image url needs to update every minute. I have this covered for img tags in the app already; is there a way to do what you have above but for the actual image being in the img tag vs in the css background-image`? –  ylluminate Jan 19 '12 at 21:15
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UPDATE: added JS and new HTML

JS

$(document).ready(function() {
    $('#dyna').change(function() {
        $('#myBox').attr('class', 'box quad' + $('#dyna').val());
    });
});

HTML

<select id="dyna">
    <option value="1">1</option>
    <option value="2">2</option>
    <option value="3">3</option>
    <option value="4">4</option>
    </select>
<div id="myBox" class="box quad1"></div>
<!-- if manually, change the "quad" class number accordingly-->

CSS

.box{
    background:url('http://i.stack.imgur.com/HQaif.jpg');
    width:512px;
    height:512px;
    background-size: 200%;
    background-repeat:no-repeat;
}

.quad1{
    background-position: 0% 0%;
}

.quad2{
    background-position: 100% 0;
}

.quad3{
    background-position: 0 100%;
}

.quad4{
    background-position: 100% 100%;
}

you may add javascript to dynamically change the "quad" class (quad1 to quad4)

see in action: http://jsfiddle.net/EMKHJ/3/

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However this isn't scaling the appropriate quadrant down though from what your example shows... –  ylluminate Jan 19 '12 at 9:19
    
oops, forgot the scale part. i'll update –  Joseph the Dreamer Jan 19 '12 at 9:23
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You can assign the image as a backround image to an element and use background-position: 0px -30px; for example to display that portion of the image. Basically you define the height and width of the element to the size of the quadrant you want to use and then move that quadrant to be visible using the css background-position: property.

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This is an example of common usage of sprites and it does not resize/scale the image. –  Stefan Jan 19 '12 at 9:00
    
This won't shrink down the image. The background of the section to be displayed would be cropped. –  Rory McCrossan Jan 19 '12 at 9:00
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