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I have a list of values like this:

("UXT8","U61J","U61W","U62U","X82U","U5NF","U635","U526","28FX")

I would like to be able to extract from a table how many times each one of them occurs in a field of a table, even when the number of occurences is 0.

What I am looking is similar to

select key_field, count(*) from table
where key_field in ("UXT8","U61J","U61W","U62U","X82U","U5NF","U635","U526","28FX")
group by key_field;

but with a kind of left join effect.

Is this possible in sql, and specifically in its sqlite or mysql variants?

Thanks

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Did you try to execute your query? What was the result? –  user647772 Jan 19 '12 at 9:35
    
I executed the equivalent for my database (fields and values have been changed in the post) and it works, but when a value in the list never appears in the table, I get no result for that value, and I want instead to output i.e.: "U5NF", 0 –  simone Jan 19 '12 at 9:39
    
your query wont be able to give the '0' since the query select criteria is if it is present. The zero you'll have to get via some other logic. –  Nanda Jan 19 '12 at 9:42
    
I guess you can left join a subselect where you have "SELECT 'UXT8' UNION SELECT 'U61J', ..." but if it's possible to store the values in a (temporary) table, this might be preferrable. –  user806549 Jan 19 '12 at 9:48
    
@simone: Do you have a reference table in your database that holds all permissable values of key_field? –  Mark Bannister Jan 19 '12 at 10:04

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would use a union to build a memory table instead of the list:

select t.code, count(mytable.unique_id) from 
  (
  select 'UXT8' as code union 
  select 'U61J' as code union 
  select 'U61W' as code union 
  select 'U62U' as code union 
  select 'X82U' as code union 
  select 'U5NF' as code union 
  select 'U635' as code union 
  select 'U526' as code union 
  select '28FX' as code
  ) as t 
 left outer join mytable on t.code = mytable.key_field
 group by t.code
 order by t.code;
share|improve this answer
    
I have actually tested this on my database. It works correctly (of course with slightly different table names and values). Right would join gives incorrect result since it shows also irrelevant values from 'mytable'. –  DRCB Jan 19 '12 at 10:39
    
yes, I am sorry, I misread the question! –  newtover Jan 19 '12 at 10:47

That query only fails because it doesn't so the keys with 0 because they don't exist.

So, do this:

create table #temptable(
  key_field varchar(4)
)

insert into #temptable values ("UXT8"), ("U61J"), ("U61W"), ("U62U"), ("X82U"), ("U5NF"), ("U635"), ("U526"), ("28FX")

and afterwords do this select:

select a.key_field, case when b.counter is null then 0 else b.counter end as counter from #temptable a
left outer join
(select key_field, count(*) counter from table
where key_field in ("UXT8","U61J","U61W","U62U","X82U","U5NF","U635","U526","28FX")
group by key_field) b on a.key_field = b.keyfield
share|improve this answer

No, you can't do this in SQL, except, in dialects that support derived tables, by using a very ugly approach involving a union of n selects of the form "select 'utx8'. A more workable alternative would be to insert those values into a temp table and outer join to that.

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Simply use a not in to find out the key_fields that don't match any value from the given list.

select key_field, count(*) as counter
  from table
 where key_field in ('UXT8','U61J','U61W','U62U','X82U','U5NF','U635','U526','28FX')
 group by key_field

 union all

select key_field, 0 as counter
  from table
 where key_field not in ('UXT8','U61J','U61W','U62U','X82U','U5NF','U635','U526','28FX')
 group by key_field;

You only need to make an union with a second query that looks like the first one but with not in operator and zero counter.

share|improve this answer
    
this gives not what the OP wants –  newtover Jan 19 '12 at 10:48
    
@newtover Can you explain me, why it doesn't give what the OP wants? –  Jose Rui Santos Jan 19 '12 at 10:59
    
because it lists all key_fields from table with some counts instead of the key_fields within IN list with their counts. –  newtover Jan 19 '12 at 11:01
    
Thanks, I got you. However is not very clear that OP really asked that. I wish everybody would ask questions with some expected dataset samples, that would avoid a lot of misinterpretations. –  Jose Rui Santos Jan 19 '12 at 11:09
    
people watching the mysql tag are more tolerant than those who watch python. The other day I grabbed several down-votes in a couple of minutes for a similar misreading =) –  newtover Jan 19 '12 at 11:15
SELECT key_field, COALESCE(cnt, 0) as cnt
FROM (
  SELECT 'UXT8' AS key_field UNION ALL
  SELECT 'U61J' AS key_field UNION ALL
  SELECT 'U61W' AS key_field UNION ALL
  SELECT 'U62U' AS key_field UNION ALL
  SELECT 'X82U' AS key_field UNION ALL
  SELECT 'U5NF' AS key_field UNION ALL
  SELECT 'U635' AS key_field UNION ALL
  SELECT 'U526' AS key_field UNION ALL
  SELECT '28FX'    
) as f
LEFT JOIN (
  SELECT key_field, count(*) as cnt
  FROM thetable
  WHERE key_field IN ("UXT8","U61J","U61W",
                      "U62U","X82U","U5NF",
                      "U635","U526","28FX")
  GROUP BY key_field) as cnts
USING (key_field);
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