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I would like to be able to do something like this:

def closure = { 
  def a // create new variable, but ONLY if not created yet
  if (a == null) {
    a = 0
  }
  a++
  print a
}

closure() // prints 1
closure() // prints 2
closure() // prints 3, etc...

I want to create the variable INSIDE the closure, not in outer scope.

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1  
Why is it that you don't want to define the variable in an outer scope? It seems to me that it would be a simple and effective solution :S –  epidemian Jan 19 '12 at 14:26

2 Answers 2

This may be an invalid answer but the outer scope doesn't need to be global; it can be inside a function for example, or even an anonymous function like:

def closure = {
    def a
    return { 
        if (a == null) a = 1
        println a++ 
    }
}()

closure() // prints 1
closure() // prints 2
closure() // prints 3, etc...

The purpose of the surrounding anonymous function is just to give scope to the a variable without polluting the global scope. Notice that that function is being evaluated immediately after its definition.

This way, the scope of a is effectively "private" to that closure (as it is the only one with a reference to it once the outer function has been evaluated). But the variable is being defined before the first closure() call, so this might not be what you are looking for.

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4  
+1 genius :-) All you need is def closure = { a = 1 ; { -> println a++ } }() –  tim_yates Jan 19 '12 at 16:35
1  
you can feel javascript experience behind ;) –  fixitagain Jan 19 '12 at 16:44
    
@tim_yates (you missed a def =P) Yeah, I initially did exactly that, but then I added the if to initialize the variable there and make it more similar to what the OP asked for (maybe he wants to use something more complex than an int and the initialization is expensive). –  epidemian Jan 19 '12 at 18:53
1  
@fixitagain One does not simply leave the Callback Hell hehe –  epidemian Jan 19 '12 at 18:55
    
You don't need the def. At least not in the groovy console –  tim_yates Jan 19 '12 at 18:55

You can do something like this:

def closure = { 
  if( !delegate.hasProperty( 'a' ) ) {
    println "Adding a to delegate"
    delegate.metaClass.a = 0
  }
  delegate.a++
  println delegate.a
}

closure() // prints 1
closure() // prints 2
closure() // prints 3, etc...

But that's a nasty side-effect, and if you don't take care it's going to bite you hard (and any sort of multi-threading will fail horribly)

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