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I am not sure what's wrong with this code :

std::vector<int> myVector(0);

if (myVector.back() == 12)
    myVector.push_back(12);

It seems that calling back() on an empty vector crashes the program.

I don't understand why it's crashing? Do we need to check the length of the vector before calling back()? or is possible that it's a bug?

The documentation says, that if the vector is empty it return an undefined value.

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I suspect it amounts to someone giving you -1 for using MSDN as your reference instead of the C++ standard. Implementers are allowed to further define what their implementation does in cases the standard says are UB, so if MS wants to guarantee that back() will return when used on an empty vector, they're entitled to do so. If you're using MSVC++ then you're entitled to read their documentation. But it might instead be -1 for not realising that using an "undefined value" in any way, can cause a crash. –  Steve Jessop Jan 19 '12 at 10:24
    
@SteveJessop I would think that MSDN is the implementation of the C++ standard. But it feels weird that calling a method on a valid element (as far as I know an empty is vector is a valid element) crashes my program. Well if the standard says so, so be it :) –  MBen Jan 19 '12 at 11:46
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MSVC++ is an implementation of (approximately) the C++ standard. Other implementations behave differently, if the standard doesn't state the behavior. The reason the standard doesn't define calling back() on an empty vector is so implementations don't need special-case code for it. They can therefore choose to be faster than they would be if they had to check whether the vector was empty or not, and do different things in different cases. They will be prone to crash (or worse) when you do something wrong. It may feel weird, but it's a trade-off made as part of the design of the language. –  Steve Jessop Jan 19 '12 at 12:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

do we need to check the length of the vector before calling back() ?

In a word: yes. This is your bug, your vector is empty so there is no "back" element.

The documentation should say (if it says anything at all) that calling back() on an empty vector causes undefined behavior, not that it returns an undefined value.

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For some reason, MSDN does say "the return value is undefined" (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/0532x4xk%28v=vs.80%29.aspx). But it also says, "When compiling with _SECURE_SCL 1, a runtime error will occur if you attempt to access an element in an empty vector". I don't know (a) why MS is referring to a reference as a "value", or (b) how they square the notion of an "undefined value" with the notion of a reference that results in a runtime error when used. But that runtime error might well be the same thing the questioner describes as "crashing". –  Steve Jessop Jan 19 '12 at 10:19
    
I still think it's weird that calling a method on a valid element crashes my program. –  MBen Jan 19 '12 at 11:44
    
@MBen: But there are no elements in your vector; it is a precondition of back() that there is at least one element in your vector. That's the way the interface is defined. You need to ensure that your input complies with the precondition before attempting to call back(). –  Charles Bailey Jan 19 '12 at 11:52
    
@MBen: Reading back you comment, when you said "on a valid element", did you mean "on a valid object"? I think I may have misinterpreted what you wrote. –  Charles Bailey Jan 19 '12 at 12:05
    
@CharlesBailey yes sorry, I meant an empty vector is a valid element, it's not garbage or null, that why I was surprised :-) –  MBen Jan 19 '12 at 13:16

c++11 standard tells this:

23.3.2.8 / 3

The effect of calling front() or back() for a zero-sized array is undefined.

Since the behaviour is undefined, anything can happen. You were lucky to get a crash.

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I don't think I am lucky, it feels weird that calling a method on a valid value crashes my program. –  MBen Jan 19 '12 at 11:44
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@MBen Having a program crash on UB is good, because it's easy to catch the error. When it sometimes works and sometimes not, it's very difficult to find the bug. –  BЈовић Jan 19 '12 at 11:52
    
I agree. I just need to make sure the vector has elements :-) –  MBen Jan 19 '12 at 13:15

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