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I have two tables.

First contain list of used words, second keep black list of words which can't be shown ever.

First table (A) example

+---------------+
| keyword       |
+---------------+
| php           |
| php developer |
| developer     |
| c#            |
+---------------+

Second table (B) example:

+-----------+
| word      |
+-----------+
| developer |
| foo       |
| music     |
+-----------+

I have to show everything from 1st table except rows which fully or partially contain words from second table. Based on content above, for instance, i should show only two rows php and c#.

How i can reach the same result with help SQL (very good if it will be one)

I can make only this

select * from A where keyword not in(select word from B);

but it's strict comparision. it's not enough to me.

Any advice are welcome. Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It would be something like this:

select keyword from A where keyword not in
   (select A.keyword from A
    inner join B on A.keyword like '%' + B.keyword + '%')

You select all the words from A that contain words of B and afterwords you select the other words.

share|improve this answer
    
for mysql seems instead % + keyword + % might be used concat() function and yes thank you for comment they are working well –  user1016265 Jan 19 '12 at 10:27
    
yep, it also works that way :) –  aF. Jan 19 '12 at 10:28
    
Note this solution is not optimal and will slow down on large sets of data (more than it should). As it will query table A twice rather than just restricting table A to those which don't match. See my answer for a solution that doesn't query table A twice. –  Seph Jan 19 '12 at 10:29

You want:

SELECT keyword FROM A 
WHERE NOT EXISTS (
    SELECT TOP 1 1 FROM B 
    WHERE A.keyword LIKE '%' + B.word + '%' )

Note that doing this kind of like query with a % at the start of the term causes indexes on B.word to not be used.

My test code (using SQL Server so the table declares for testing are TSQL but still relevant):

DECLARE @A TABLE
(
keyword varchar(50)
)

DECLARE @B TABLE
(
word varchar(50)
)

INSERT INTO @A VALUES ('php'), ('php developer'), ('Developer'), ('C#')
INSERT INTO @B VALUES ('developer'), ('fcuk'), ('music')

SELECT keyword  FROM @A A WHERE NOT EXISTS (SELECT TOP 1 1 FROM @B B WHERE a.keyword LIKE '%' + B.word + '%')

Results:

keyword
php
C#

Edit: A little more explanation:

This query is the logical extension of your query:

select * from A
where keyword not in(
    select word from B);

Which can be written as the following (which is logically the exact same):

SELECT * FROM A 
WHERE NOT EXISTS (
    SELECT * FROM B 
    WHERE A.keyword = B.word)

What we want is to do is exclude records where the A.keyword contains the B.Word value. This is done by pre-pending and appending a '%' character and performing a LIKE rather than =

thus the query becomes:

SELECT * FROM A 
WHERE NOT EXISTS (
    SELECT * FROM B 
    WHERE A.keyword LIKE = '%' + B.word + '%')

The SELECT 1 1 is just pointless and can equally be SELECT * if you rather, they both to the same thing inside an EXISTS statement and there's many answers here on StackOverflow dedicated to explaining why they're the same.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Depending on whether keywords can be entered as upper/lower case and whether case sensitivity is enabled in the OP's database, it may be useful to explicitly convert both a.keyword and B.word to lower case when joining on them. –  Mark Bannister Jan 19 '12 at 10:23
    
thanks for answer –  user1016265 Jan 19 '12 at 10:29
    
yes you are right about quantity of queries to one table, like above suggested, but could you more explain your query ? –  user1016265 Jan 19 '12 at 13:10

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