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I have build a desktop application that connected to database, the function is add-delete-modify. I make it separate to 3 JInternalFrame.

The problem now is, when I execute bulk update to update >500 orders, my application will hang but it is processing the request. Then I will run this application again, so now I have 2 windows opened with same application. After the 1st application is done for the job, I can use my previous application again.

Now my question is, how to implement thread to my app so that I can run as many function in same window application?

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5 Answers 5

Long-running tasks (like your bulk update) must not be done in the event dispatch thread (the thread where all the GUI operations are made), else, as you observed, the GUI freezes.

Use SwingWorker to execute your long-running tasks in a background thread. Its javadoc has a useful example, and its also described in the Swing tutorial.

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Hi HB Nizet, thanks for the suggestion. After i read the tutorial, how to make Initial threads, event dispatch thread, or Worker threads? –  lagunaloire Jan 19 '12 at 10:37
1  
If you haven't understood this from the tutorial, then re-read it. The initial thread is the main thread, which executes your main method. The EDT is the thread created automatically when you invoke SwingUtilities.invokeLater(...) to create and display your GUI from the main method. The worker threads are the ones created for you by SwingWorker. Read it carefully. –  JB Nizet Jan 19 '12 at 10:46
    
yea, you rite i didnt read it carefully... ok lemme dig it more. –  lagunaloire Jan 19 '12 at 13:07
    
hmm... tried to implement to my code but got error in everywhere :S –  lagunaloire Jan 30 '12 at 11:12
    
JB Nizet, would you share with me if you have 'good read' example of SwingWorker? –  lagunaloire Jan 30 '12 at 11:34

Multi Threading in java now is very simple with the addition of [java.util.concurrent.][1]

What you need to do is

  1. split the 500 job orders into smaller batches, say 10 per batch.
    1. Create a threadpool with a configured number of threads, say 10 threads.
    2. Create a Runnable/callable task which will pick up these batches from a common place and do the CRUD operations on the DB.
    3. You will additionally need a common data structure which will have the results of these CRUD operations. So once the Runnable/callable task finishes it's operation, it updates this data structure with the result of the operation
    4. Also keep in mind that the access to these data structures - the one that holds the batch of job orders - the one that holds the result of operations should be synchronized.

For thread pool you can use one of the

Executors.newFixedThreadPool or Executors.newCachedThreadPool()
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Take a look at Swing Threads.

Especially at:

SwingUtilities.invokeLater()
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What you should do is to seperate your UI class from your Database Access and Modifications class. You can then, from your UI you can then call something like this:

new Thread(new Runnable()
{
    public void run()
    {
        //Call database stuff here
    }
}).start();

Note however, that having a lot of database operations going on at the same time can cause errors especially since the database might lock tables to which it is currently reading/writing to. What I suggest is that you keep it to one operation at a time and use threads to display a marquee progress bar or something similar.

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Hi npinti, thanks for your reply, i think I will go to JB Nizet suggestion because when I read about concurrency in swing, i think i didnt fulfill that rule. Hence my application is freezes when i execute a long tasks –  lagunaloire Jan 19 '12 at 10:45

i'd just use:

new Thread(new Runnable()
{
    public void run()
    {
        //Things to do in new thread...
    }
}).start();

Or if you want to use that often, you can make class that implements Runnable, so you dont have to rewrite everything in run() function.

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