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I've been using Intel's SSE intrinsics for quite some time with good performance gains. Hence, I expected the AVX intrinsics to further speed-up my programs. This, unfortunately, was not the case until now. Probably I am doing a stupid mistake, so I would be very grateful if somebody could help me out.

I use Ubuntu 11.10 with g++ 4.6.1. I compiled my program (see below) with

g++ simpleExample.cpp -O3 -march=native -o simpleExample

The test system has a Intel i7-2600 CPU.

Here is the code which exemplifies my problem. On my system, I get the output

98.715 ms, b[42] = 0.900038 // Naive
24.457 ms, b[42] = 0.900038 // SSE
24.646 ms, b[42] = 0.900038 // AVX

Note that the computation sqrt(sqrt(sqrt(x))) was only chosen to ensure that memory bandwith does not limit execution speed; it is just an example.

simpleExample.cpp:

#include <immintrin.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <math.h> 
#include <sys/time.h>

using namespace std;

// -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
// This function returns the current time, expressed as seconds since the Epoch
// -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
double getCurrentTime(){
  struct timeval curr;
  struct timezone tz;
  gettimeofday(&curr, &tz);
  double tmp = static_cast<double>(curr.tv_sec) * static_cast<double>(1000000)
             + static_cast<double>(curr.tv_usec);
  return tmp*1e-6;
}

// -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
// Main routine
// -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
int main() {

  srand48(0);            // seed PRNG
  double e,s;            // timestamp variables
  float *a, *b;          // data pointers
  float *pA,*pB;         // work pointer
  __m128 rA,rB;          // variables for SSE
  __m256 rA_AVX, rB_AVX; // variables for AVX

  // define vector size 
  const int vector_size = 10000000;

  // allocate memory 
  a = (float*) _mm_malloc (vector_size*sizeof(float),32);
  b = (float*) _mm_malloc (vector_size*sizeof(float),32);

  // initialize vectors //
  for(int i=0;i<vector_size;i++) {
    a[i]=fabs(drand48());
    b[i]=0.0f;
  }

// +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
// Naive implementation
// +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
  s = getCurrentTime();
  for (int i=0; i<vector_size; i++){
    b[i] = sqrtf(sqrtf(sqrtf(a[i])));
  }
  e = getCurrentTime();
  cout << (e-s)*1000 << " ms" << ", b[42] = " << b[42] << endl;

// -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
  for(int i=0;i<vector_size;i++) {
    b[i]=0.0f;
  }
// -----------------------------------------------------------------------------

// +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
// SSE2 implementation
// +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
  pA = a; pB = b;

  s = getCurrentTime();
  for (int i=0; i<vector_size; i+=4){
    rA   = _mm_load_ps(pA);
    rB   = _mm_sqrt_ps(_mm_sqrt_ps(_mm_sqrt_ps(rA)));
    _mm_store_ps(pB,rB);
    pA += 4;
    pB += 4;
  }
  e = getCurrentTime();
  cout << (e-s)*1000 << " ms" << ", b[42] = " << b[42] << endl;

// -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
  for(int i=0;i<vector_size;i++) {
    b[i]=0.0f;
  }
// -----------------------------------------------------------------------------

// +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
// AVX implementation
// +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
  pA = a; pB = b;

  s = getCurrentTime();
  for (int i=0; i<vector_size; i+=8){
    rA_AVX   = _mm256_load_ps(pA);
    rB_AVX   = _mm256_sqrt_ps(_mm256_sqrt_ps(_mm256_sqrt_ps(rA_AVX)));
    _mm256_store_ps(pB,rB_AVX);
    pA += 8;
    pB += 8;
  }
  e = getCurrentTime();
  cout << (e-s)*1000 << " ms" << ", b[42] = " << b[42] << endl;

  _mm_free(a);
  _mm_free(b);

  return 0;
}

Any help is appreciated!

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3 Answers 3

If you are interested in increasing square root performance, instead of VSQRTPS you can use VRSQRTPS and Newton-Raphson formula:

x0 = vrsqrtps(a)
x1 = 0.5 * x0 * (3 - (a * x0) * x0)

VRSQRTPS itself doesn't benefit from AVX, but other calculations do.

Use it if 23 bits of precision is enough for you.

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This is because VSQRTPS (AVX instruction) takes exactly twice as many cycles as SQRTPS (SSE instruction) on a Sandy Bridge processor. See Agner Fog's optimize guide: instruction tables, page 88.

Instructions like square root and division don't benefit from AVX. On the other hand, additions, multiplications, etc., do.

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Depending on your processor hardware, the AVX instructions may be emulated in the hardware as SSE instructions. You'd need to look up your processor's part number to get exact specs on it, but this is one of the main differences between low-end and high-end intel processors, the number of specialize execution units vs. hardware emulation.

share|improve this answer
    
I wasn't aware that AVX was ever emulated - do you have a reference for this ? On which CPUs specifically would this be the case ? –  Paul R Jan 19 '12 at 11:00
16  
On Sandy Bridge, according to the instruction tables, page 87--88, it seems that VDIVPS/PD execute 2 microops on port 0, compared to 1 microop for DIVPS/PS. SQRT instructions will be similar. Since the division unit is not pipelined, the execution takes 2x longer. This indicates that Sandy Bridge indeed has only 128-bit implementation of the division unit. –  Norbert P. Jan 19 '12 at 11:42
    
@Norbert: thanks for the clarification - I wasn't aware of that –  Paul R Jan 19 '12 at 12:06
    
@SoapBox: please list a high-end and a low-end processor as an example for comparison please. –  fchen Nov 7 '13 at 19:31

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