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I have a master table A with a composite primary key, consisting of two columns. One of these columns is a constant ("THE CONSTANT VALUE" in the code below). This table definition looks like the following:

@Entity public class Master {
  @Id
  @Column(name = "SIGNIFICANT_KEY")
  private String realKey;

  @Id
  @Column(name = "CONSTANT_KEY")
  private String constantPartKey;
}

I have a detail table B, referencing master table A using only one (non-constant) column. I want to implement usual ManyToOne and OneToMany relations between the two tables.

Question: How can I handle this situation with Hibernate?

The only solution for master reference I found relies on using formulas:

@Entity public class Detail {
  @ManyToOne
  @JoinColumnsOrFormulas(value={
    @JoinColumnOrFormula(column=
      @JoinColumn(name = "SIGNIFICANT_KEY",
                  referencedColumnName = "SIGNIFICANT_KEY",
                  insertable=false, updatable=false, nullable = false)),
    @JoinColumnOrFormula(formula=
      @JoinFormula(referencedColumnName="CONSTANT_KEY", value="'THE CONSTANT VALUE'"))
  })
  Master master;
}

Now I see other problem: I cannot use this field in OneToMany relation due to the java.lang.ClassCastException problem I've reported here earlier: https://hibernate.onjira.com/browse/HHH-6811

share|improve this question
    
How can a primary key consist of a constant column? In the situation you're describing the "real" key is the non-constant column of the composite key. –  James DW Jan 19 '12 at 12:18
    
@James DW The concrete legacy application uses a constant value for the second part of the key. The same application owns the detail table which relies on this "feature" –  Vladimir Jan 19 '12 at 17:15

1 Answer 1

I really wonder how it can be helpful to have a constant column value in a database, but anyway...

What I would do is to only map the non-constant column as ID, and make the constant column a regular column, with a constant value:

@Entity
public class Strange {
    @Id
    private Long id;

    @Column
    private long constant = 345; // the constant that you want in your database

    @OneToMany(mappedBy = "strange")
    private Set<Detail> details;

    ...
    // no setter for constant!
}

@Entity
public class Detail {
   ...
   @ManyToOne
   @JoinColumn(name = "strange_id")
   private Strange strange;
}

If other entities reference this same Strange entity using its full composite key, then simply do the following:

@Entity
public class Strange {
    @Id
    @Column(name = "strange_id")
    private Long id;

    @Id
    private long constant = 345; // the constant that you want in your database

    @OneToMany(mappedBy = "strange")
    private Set<Detail> details;

    ...
    // no setter for constant!
}

@Entity
public class Detail {
   ...
   @ManyToOne
   @JoinColumn(name = "strange_id", referencedColumnName = "strange_id")
   private Strange strange;
}

You can reference other entities using something other than their PK. Another unique column is also OK. And since strange_id is unique, it fits the bill. The referencedColumnName attribute must be used to specify the referenced column name, in that case.

share|improve this answer
    
No, I have a different situation. My database is a legacy one, so I cannot change the schema. The master table has two real columns comprising a primary key. From these two columns, the second one always has the same value. –  Vladimir Jan 19 '12 at 13:21
    
I never told you to change the schema. I just told you to only map the variable column of the composite PK as the ID of the entity. Since the other column never changes, it doesn't matter if it's part of the entity ID or not. –  JB Nizet Jan 19 '12 at 13:27
    
No, I have a different situation. My database is a legacy one, so I cannot change the schema. The master table has two real columns comprising a primary key. From these two columns, the second one always has the same value. The detail table has only one column pointing to the master table. If it were two columns, I'd use @ ManyToOne with @ JoinColumns notation listing these two columns. I have to use something instead of the missing column. –  Vladimir Jan 19 '12 at 13:59
    
And, I cannot just throw away the second PK column in the master table, since other tables in the database refers this master table properly with two-columns FK. –  Vladimir Jan 19 '12 at 14:04
1  
Have you read my answer and my comment? Leave your database as it is. Don't touch it. I understood that you could not alter it. Don't. Just make as if the constant column was not part of the PK, and map it as a column, which always has the same constant value. Map the other part of the PK, which is the only varying part, as the entity ID. I even gave you the code. Try it. –  JB Nizet Jan 19 '12 at 14:06

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