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Regarding transactions in WCF services, shall I use TransactionScope object in client side application that consumes the service or in the service code? Please explain why.

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2 Answers 2

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Making a service transaction aware means that if passed a transaction it will enlist in it

Whoever consumes the service, be it a client application or another service, must create a transaction (or already be running in a transaction flowed to them) for the service to enlist - hence they must call the service from within a TransactionScope (either explicitly or implicitly by having the transaction flowed to them).

If the operation is marked as TransactionFlow(TransactionFlowOption.Allowed) then the consumer does not have to have a transaction, but then the service will not execute in a flowed transation

If the operation is marked as TransactionFlow(TransactionFlowOption.Mandatory) then the client must flow a transaction, and assuming the other bits are aligned (OperationBehavior creates auto enlists, etc) then the operation will run in the same distributed transaction

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It depends on your usage scenario. If your service function executes multiple calls that should be grouped in a transaction you should use a Transaction in your service function

Using a Transaction in your client code is useful when your client calls multiple service functions that should be bundled together in one transaction.

So for example:

public void MyServiceFunction1()
{
   using (TransactionScope transaction = new TransactionScope())
   {
      // execute some logic inside this service function that should be in a transaction
   }
} 

public void MyServiceFunction2()
{
   using (TransactionScope transaction = new TransactionScope())
   {
      // execute some logic inside this service function that should be in a transaction
   }
} 

public void MyClientFunction()
{
   using (TransactionScope transaction = new TransactionScope())
   {
      // Bundle both service calls in one transaction
      MyService service = new MyService();
      service.MyServiceFunction1();
      service.MyServiceFunction2();
   }
}

Be aware however that you need to configure your WCF bindings correctly to make sure that the transaction is passed from client to server. It will then automatically promote in a distributed transaction.

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