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I have the following XML Tag

<price currency="euros">20000.00</price>

How do I restrict the currency attribute to one the following:

  • euros
  • pounds
  • dollars

AND the price to a double?

I just get an error when I try to a type on both, here's what I've got so far:

<xs:element name="price">
    <xs:complexType>
        <xs:attribute name="currency" type="xs:string">
            <xs:simpleType>
                <xs:restriction base="xs:string">
                    <xs:enumeration value="pounds" />
                    <xs:enumeration value="euros" />
                    <xs:enumeration value="dollars" />
                </xs:restriction>
            </xs:simpleType>
        </xs:attribute>
    </xs:complexType>
</xs:element>
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1  
If you do this you need to remove type="xs:string" from the <xs:attribute> element as well. You can't give the type when simpleType or complexType is present. – Paul Jul 1 '15 at 8:08
up vote 81 down vote accepted

The numerical value seems to be missing from your price definition. Try the following:

<xs:simpleType name="curr">
  <xs:restriction base="xs:string">
    <xs:enumeration value="pounds" />
    <xs:enumeration value="euros" />
    <xs:enumeration value="dollars" />
  </xs:restriction>
</xs:simpleType>



<xs:element name="price">
        <xs:complexType>
            <xs:extension base="xs:decimal">
              <xs:attribute name="currency" type="curr"/>
            </xs:extension>
        </xs:complexType>
</xs:element>
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1  
As answered by @kjhughes, the <xs:extension can't directly be a child of <xs:complexType but instead must also be contained by a <xs:complexContent or <xs:simpleContent. – HankCa Jan 12 at 6:17

you need to create a type and make the attribute of that type:

<xs:simpleType name="curr">
  <xs:restriction base="xs:string">
    <xs:enumeration value="pounds" />
    <xs:enumeration value="euros" />
    <xs:enumeration value="dollars" />
  </xs:restriction>
</xs:simpleType>

then:

<xs:complexType>
    <xs:attribute name="currency" type="curr"/>
</xs:complexType>
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Hello, Sadly this doesn't allow me to restrict the Price type to "double" AND the restriction enumeration on the "currency" attribute at the same time – Luke Jan 19 '12 at 12:48

New answer to old question

None of the existing answers to this old question address the real problem.

The real problem was that xs:complexType cannot directly have a xs:extension as a child in XSD. The fix is to use xs:simpleContent first. Details follow...


Your XML,

<price currency="euros">20000.00</price>

will be valid against either of the following corrected XSDs:

Locally defined attribute type

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xs:schema xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">

  <xs:element name="price">
    <xs:complexType>
      <xs:simpleContent>
        <xs:extension base="xs:decimal">
          <xs:attribute name="currency">
            <xs:simpleType>
              <xs:restriction base="xs:string">
                <xs:enumeration value="pounds" />
                <xs:enumeration value="euros" />
                <xs:enumeration value="dollars" />
              </xs:restriction>
            </xs:simpleType>
          </xs:attribute>
        </xs:extension>
      </xs:simpleContent>
    </xs:complexType>
  </xs:element>
</xs:schema>

Globally defined attribute type

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xs:schema xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">

  <xs:simpleType name="currencyType">
    <xs:restriction base="xs:string">
      <xs:enumeration value="pounds" />
      <xs:enumeration value="euros" />
      <xs:enumeration value="dollars" />
    </xs:restriction>
  </xs:simpleType>

  <xs:element name="price">
    <xs:complexType>
      <xs:simpleContent>
        <xs:extension base="xs:decimal">
          <xs:attribute name="currency" type="currencyType"/>
        </xs:extension>
      </xs:simpleContent>
    </xs:complexType>
  </xs:element>
</xs:schema>

Notes

  • As commented by @Paul, these do change the content type of price from xs:string to xs:decimal, but this is not strictly necessary and was not the real problem.
  • As answered by @user998692, you could separate out the definition of currency, and you could change to xs:decimal, but this too was not the real problem.

The real problem was that xs:complexType cannot directly have a xs:extension as a child in XSD; xs:simpleContent is needed first.

A related matter (that wasn't asked but may have confused other answers):

How could price be restricted given that it has an attribute?

In this case, a separate, global definition of priceType would be needed; it is not possible to do this with only local type definitions.

How to restrict element content when element has attribute

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xs:schema xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">

  <xs:simpleType name="priceType">  
    <xs:restriction base="xs:decimal">  
      <xs:minInclusive value="0.00"/>  
      <xs:maxInclusive value="99999.99"/>  
    </xs:restriction>  
  </xs:simpleType>

  <xs:element name="price">
    <xs:complexType>
      <xs:simpleContent>
        <xs:extension base="priceType">
          <xs:attribute name="currency">
            <xs:simpleType>
              <xs:restriction base="xs:string">
                <xs:enumeration value="pounds" />
                <xs:enumeration value="euros" />
                <xs:enumeration value="dollars" />
              </xs:restriction>
            </xs:simpleType>
          </xs:attribute>
        </xs:extension>
      </xs:simpleContent>
    </xs:complexType>
  </xs:element>
</xs:schema>
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