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Let's say I have a class which has a property hiding it's base property and a nested class inside this class. Is it possible to access the base hidden *virtual* property from the nested class?

Here is an example:

class BaseClass
{
    protected virtual String SomeProperty {get; set;}
}

class Inherited : BaseClass
{
    protected new String SomeProperty {get; set;}

    class Nested
    {
        Inherited parent;
        public Nested(Inherited parent)
        {
            this.parent = parent;
        }

        public void SomeMethod()
        {
            //How do I access the SomeProperty which belongs to the BaseClass? 
        }
    }
}

The only solution that I can think of is to add a private method to Inherited class which returns base.SomeProperty Is there a better solution?

share|improve this question
    
Where are you trying to access it from, and why have you hidden the property in the first place? –  Jon Skeet Jan 19 '12 at 12:09
    
I'm trying to access it from the method of the nested class. I have hidden the base property because the new property provides more features than the base property and I do not want to have two properties. –  Giorgi Jan 19 '12 at 12:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could cast your InheritedClass reference to BaseClass. Since you hide the base property instead of overriding it, this should do the trick.

public void SomeMethod()
{
    BaseClass baseRef = parent;
    // do stuff with the base property:
    baseRef.SomeProperty = someValue;
}

Edit:

To make this work, the SomeProperty property of the BaseClass has to be accessible to the nested class, either by making it internal (if you don't want to make the property accessible outside the declaring assembly) or protected internal (if you want to allow overriding in derived classes from other assemblies).

If both options are off limits (ie. when your derived class already is in another assembly), you won't get around declaring a wrapper property.

private string SomeBaseProperty
{
    get
    {
        return base.SomeProperty;
    }

    set
    {
        base.SomeProperty = value;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer, I forgot that the property is indeed virtual. I have updated my question. –  Giorgi Jan 19 '12 at 12:15
    
As long as you still use shadowing, my solution will work anyway ;) –  Nuffin Jan 19 '12 at 12:16
    
This is causing Compiler Error CS1540: Cannot access protected member 'member' via a qualifier of type 'type1'; the qualifier must be of type 'type2' (or derived from it) msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/s9zta243.aspx –  Giorgi Jan 19 '12 at 18:11
    
why is the property protected anyway? Can't you just make it internal or protected internal? –  Nuffin Jan 20 '12 at 8:17
    
Unfortunately I can't modify base class source code as it is a framework dll. –  Giorgi Jan 20 '12 at 11:50

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