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I have a big apache configuration file and in each of the virtualhost sections, I want to add its own log entry. I am wondering if I can do it with a script.

My current configuration file is something like this;

ServerName abc.com   
some information.   
…   
……   

and I want to have it something like;

ServerName abc.com    
CustomLog "/usr/local/logs/abc.com.log"    
some information.    
…   
……       

Is it possible by some sort of script? I have lots and lots of such virtualhost entries, so manually updating is impossible.. Any ideas?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

awk can be much simpler to use.

awk 'NR==3{print "my log"}1' INPUT_FILE
  • NR is a built-in variable that tracks line numbers.
  • You can also use -v and a variable name to pass values dynamically instead of hard-coding it in the script. eg. awk -v line="$var" 'NR==line{print "my log"}1' INPUT_FILE. In this case, line is an awk variable and $var can be your bash variable defined outside of awk's scope.

Test:

[jaypal:~/Temp] cat file
ServerName abc.com   
some information.   
…   
……  

[jaypal:~/Temp] awk 'NR==3{print "my log"}1' file # add log after 2 lines
ServerName abc.com   
some information.   
my log
…   
……  

[jaypal:~/Temp] awk 'NR==4{print "my log"}1' file # add log after 3 lines
ServerName abc.com   
some information.   
…   
my log
……  

[jaypal:~/Temp] var=2 # define a variable which holds the line number you want to print on
[jaypal:~/Temp] awk -v line="$var" 'NR==line{print "my log"}1' file
ServerName abc.com   
my log
some information.   
…   
……  

In the comments I saw your question of adding your log after 3 lines starting from the matched pattern (ServerName, in this example). For that you can try something like this -

awk '/ServerName/{a=NR;print;next} NR==(a+3){print$0;print "my log";next}1' file

[jaypal:~/Temp] awk '/ServerName/{a=NR;print;next} NR==(a+3){print$0;print "my log";next}1' file
ServerName abc.com   
some information.   
…   
……  
my log
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Sed will make quick work of this:

sed 's=^ServerName \(.*\)=&\nCustomLog "/usr/local/logs/\1.log"='

Edit: I previously posted something else, then went and test it and I had made a mistake. So I tested choroba's answer, found that didn't quite work either, so fixed it and simplified it too.

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Thank you for the help...however it is printing in the same line and not in the next line.. –  Sangfroid Jan 19 '12 at 15:07
    
Please ignore my previous comment...that was bsd doing crap..it worked in linux.Thanks a lot. –  Sangfroid Jan 19 '12 at 15:37
    
By the way, say if i wish to add that custom log only after 3 lines after it finds the pattern servername , how do i do that ? I will also highly appreciate if you can recommend any good tutorials on such commands... i like to know how to catch fish :) Thank you. –  Sangfroid Jan 19 '12 at 15:37
    
@Sangfroid You can use awk for that. I have added a solution that might help you resolve your question. –  jaypal singh Jan 19 '12 at 19:29
    
Thank you Jaypal. It worked with a minor tweak...By the way, which book do you suggest for such ? –  Sangfroid Jan 21 '12 at 13:56

Try this sed script:

sed -i~ '/^ServerName /s=^serverName \(.*\)=&\nCustomLog "/usr/local/logs/\1.log"=' config_file*

(untested)

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Actually none of the answers worked for me when I tried them on my Mac for these reasons:

  • sed requires \ before opening and closing parenthesis for grouping
  • Putting \n in replacement pattern just inserts an n.
  • Bakkreference \1 didn't work for a operation

Here is a command that worked:

sed -i.bak 's~^ServerName \(.*\)$~&\
CustomLog "/usr/local/logs/\1.log"~g' *.conf
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This adds the desired line after 3 after the correct ServerName.

perl -i~ -ne'
   print;
   $target = $.+3 if /^\QServerName abc.com\E\s*$/;
   print qq{CustomLog "/usr/local/logs/abc.com.log"\n}
      if $target && $. == $target;
' apache.conf
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