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I understand that volatile prevents certain (but not all) optimizatons from being performed on variables. Although documentation is a bit confusing on the topic (e.g. Wikipedia & MSDN contradict), I understand that volatile is applying a half memory fence, which prevents certaing reordering operations. (ref. Albahari).

I also understand that it prevents the use of registers, which means that reads can never be stale due to, for example, variable hoisting in loops.

I also know from experience that the compiler berforms different (undocumented AFAIK) optimizations on different data types, making the area somewhat unpredictable.

However, something remains totally unclear to me. 64 bit values such as long cannot be decorated with volatile.

So my question is how are such variables to be handled so that they are treated the equivalent of volatile 32 bit value types?

This strikes me as an inconsistency since I don't believe that 32 and 64 bit values should be treated differently.

EDIT

Further, why does a memory barrier guarantee that the compiler will write ASM that will fetch a value from RAM and not a register? I understand why volatile will do this.

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couldn't you use Thread.MemoryBarrier to achieve a similar thing? Although annoying, I think it's reasonable that you can't have a volatile longs, because the compiler cannot guarantee support on all platforms; whereas with 32-bit values it can. –  Andras Zoltan Jan 19 '12 at 13:04
    
I don't see why the compiler couldn't support volatile longs. AFAIK, volatile isn't about atomiticity, but rather about stopping the compiler, runtime, and CPU from performing certaing optimizations. Thread.MemoryBarrier will work, yes, but as you said, is cumbersome. –  IanC Jan 19 '12 at 13:09
    
I have updated my comment to an answer; and responded to your comment –  Andras Zoltan Jan 19 '12 at 13:34

3 Answers 3

It is simply a restriction imposed by a 32-bit jitter, like the common x86 one. It cannot guarantee that variables are aligned any better than on an address that's a multiple of 4. Mostly because the heap allocator doesn't promise a better job. And no effort was made either to keep stack addresses aligned better than 4. Accordingly, a 64-bit variable may straddle the boundary of a cache line. And thus can't be atomic.

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Look at this great blog from Eric Lippert and follow the conclussion of the article ;-)
Especially on 32 systems access to 64bit longs ais not atomic!

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be careful; atomic access to 64 bit values is possible on 32 platforms, through the direct use of extra instructions (double-word compare-and-swap is used a lot in high-performance native code, especially for lock-free structures); just not specifically through .Net. –  Andras Zoltan Jan 19 '12 at 13:38

This was originally a comment but became an answer.

Couldn't you use Thread.MemoryBarrier to achieve a similar thing? Although annoying, I think it's reasonable that you can't have a volatile longs, because the compiler cannot guarantee support on all platforms; whereas with 32-bit values it can.

Thread.MemoryBarrier is a way at runtime to tell the OS to do it on your behalf; offloading the problem to the OS instead; in the same way that the Interlocked methods are not shorthand for the machine-code instructions that perform the same thing - because they cannot be guaranteed to be available on every CPU.

Volatility, as you rightly point out, is enforced on many levels: with compiler, runtime and CPU at least. In this case, .Net can guarantee all three for 32 bit values since 32 bit is ubiquitous. CPU support isn't necessarily available for 64 bit, though, through .Net; and ticking only 2 out of the 3 boxes is not enough to guarantee that the code will still work.

Edit (in response to your additional comment at the end of your question)

My understanding of MemoryBarrier is that it is an OS-enforced signal to all threads to flush all writes to RAM; and then forcing the current thread to re-load from RAM (back into registers) thus ensuring that the current thread, has the latest version of a value.

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