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I want to know if the browser supportes XMLHttpRequest.responseType = "arraybuffer". Problem is, that I can not test agains some "general" xhr2 support, since iOS 4.2 has partial xhr2 support which includes (i.e.) XMLHttpRequestUpload but not responseType = "arraybuffer".

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4 Answers 4

I am using the following:

var supported = typeof new XMLHttpRequest().responseType === 'string';

In all browsers I tested that support this, the default value of responseType is an empty string (just like it says in the spec: http://www.w3.org/TR/XMLHttpRequest/#the-responsetype-attribute ), in browsers that don't support responseType the value of the attribute is undefined.

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1  
This seems a good test. For Android 2.3 I get "undefined", for Android 4.x I get "string". Which corresponds nicely with caniuse.com/xhr2 (Like iOS 4.2, Android 2.3 appears to have XMLHttpRequestUpload support, or at least typeof(XMLHttpRequestUpload) returns "function", not "undefined") –  Darren Cook Jun 21 '13 at 10:28

Checking of ArrayBuffer should be a good feature detection.

If a userAgent supports the ArrayBuffer object then it's likely it will work with XHR2

However as noted, it would be best to do a feature test and not a feature detection.

function IsArrayBufferSupported(cb){
    var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
    xhr.open('GET', '/', true);
    try {
       xhr.responseType = "arraybuffer";
    } catch (e){
        return cb(false);
    }
    xhr.onload = function onload() {
        if (ArrayBuffer.prototype.isPrototypeOf(this.response)) {
            return cb(true);
        }
        cb(false);
    }
    xhr.send();
}
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1  
Apparently no exceptions is fired when responseType is set the a not supported value. –  Aron Woost Jan 20 '12 at 8:49
    
@AronWoost I would expect no exception to be fired, hence the return type check. However for future proofing code it's of value to use try catch in case any other userAgent throws an exception –  Raynos Jan 20 '12 at 8:56

Have you tried something like this?

if(typeof(XMLHttpRequestUpload) == "undefined"){
    //not supported
}

Edit

I think you might be stuck with somthing nasty like this

function IsArrayBufferSupported(){
    var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
    xhr.open('GET', '/', true);
    try{
       xhr.responseType = "arraybuffer";
       return true;
    }catch(e){return false;}
}
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Good idea! However, I just noticed, that mobile safari on iOS 4.2 already has "partial" xhr2 support, which seams to include XMLHttpRequestUpload but not responseType = "arraybuffer". I'll update the question accordingly. –  Aron Woost Jan 19 '12 at 14:14
    
Apparently no exceptions is fired when responseType is set the a not supported value. –  Aron Woost Jan 20 '12 at 8:49
    
Sorry, tested this with the google chrome console and it worked. (function IsArrayBufferSupported(){ var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest(); xhr.open('GET', '/', true); try{ xhr.responseType = "arraybuffer"; return true; }catch(e){return false;} })() > true (function IsArrayBufferSupported(){ var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest(); xhr.open('GET', '/', true); try{ xhr.responseType = "badarg"; return true; }catch(e){return false;} })() > false –  Sam Greenhalgh Jan 20 '12 at 9:17
1  
@SamGreenhalgh, because Google Chrome and Apple Safari are using non-standard behavior. W3 here & here do not state anywhere that an exception must/should be thrown. The preferred behavior suggest that if the string doesn't makes sense to your browser, (rather than throwing nasty exception use your "brain" and) use fallback approach to the closest available responseType. Chrome/Safari has provided this behavior before the recommendations were even published (to flash the high score on benchmarks?). –  vulcan raven Jul 22 '12 at 15:42
    
This is exactly what they did with Gradient property. By the time W3 announced the recommendations, the existing implementation in Chrome/Safari is rendered void. But at least the tentative CSS property was prefixed by -webkit. But in case of responseType, in theory the assignment should be ignored by other browsers, but in practice Chrome/Safari do throw an exception. You can defend against this using a try/catch statement, as in the example described here. –  vulcan raven Jul 22 '12 at 15:51

Set responseType to "arraybuffer" and check if it got the new value:

// call like isResponseTypeSupported('arraybuffer')
function isResponseTypeSupported(responseType) {
    var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
    xhr.open('GET', '/');
    try {
        xhr.responseType = responseType;
    } catch (e) {
        return false;
    }
    return xhr.responseType === responseType;
}
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