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I have a project which has a main form and some other forms. When the app loads it needs to carry out some tasks and show the results in a modal form on top of the main form. The problem I have is that if I put the call to the function to do the tasks / creates and Show the modal form in the main forms onshow event the modal form appears but the main form does not until the modal form is closed, which is what I would expect to happen. To counter this I have added a timer to the main form and start it on the main forms onshow event the timer calls the function to do the tasks / create and show the modal form. So now the main form appears before the modal form.

However I cannot see this being the best solution and was wondering if anyone could offer a better one.

I am using Delphi 7

Colin

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1  
use PostMessage. stackoverflow.com/questions/7094873/… –  SimaWB Jan 19 '12 at 13:22
    
sorry for the off-topic by why does this question shows "blurred" in the main questions list? –  kobik Jan 19 '12 at 14:40
    
@kobik: AFAIK questions show dimmed when they have a tag you ignore, and when they have a negative vote score that is beyond a certain limit. BTW questions about the way SO works are better asked on the meta site (see link in the main navigation). –  Marjan Venema Jan 19 '12 at 18:21
    
@Marjan, Thanks for the info. –  kobik Jan 19 '12 at 21:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

One commonly used option is to post yourself a message in the form's OnShow. Like this:

const
  WM_SHOWMYOTHERFORM = WM_USER + 0;

type
  TMyMainForm = class(TForm)
    procedure FormShow(Sender: TObject);
  protected
    procedure WMShowMyOtherForm(var Message: TMessage); message WM_SHOWMYOTHERFORM;
  end;

...


procedure TMyMainForm.FormShow(Sender: TObject);
begin
  PostMessage(Handle, WM_SHOWMYOTHERFORM, 0, 0);
end;

procedure TMyMainForm.WMShowMyOtherForm(var Message: TMessage);
begin
  inherited;
  with TMyOtherForm.Create(nil) do begin
    try
      ShowModal;
    finally
      Free;
    end;
  end;
end;
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2  
While this is the correct idea for a solution, the implementation of it shown is not so good. :) Use the custom message, and implement a handler for that specific message instead of replacing the entire WndProc. Just declare your custom message before the form's type declaration, and add procedure UMShowMyOtherForm(var Message: TMessage); message UM_SHOWMYOTHERFORM;. Then the only thing that interrupts the normal flow of WndProc is your custom message. –  Ken White Jan 19 '12 at 13:56
    
@Ken True that. I'm used to handling message IDs that are allocated at runtime –  David Heffernan Jan 19 '12 at 14:10
    
This is how those before me handled this, so I keep doing it this way because it works. Some technical details would be nice, if you have them. –  Marcus Adams Jan 19 '12 at 14:39
    
@ Dave and Ken - Thanks for your help. Very useful –  colin Jan 19 '12 at 14:42
1  
I don't use ProcessMessages. Ever. So there can't be one. I don't use third-party components that use ProcessMessages either. And I don't use third-party components without source, so they can't sneak by. :) –  Ken White Jan 19 '12 at 20:29

Why dont you use the MainForm OnActivate event like so?

procedure TMyMainForm.FormActivate(Sender: TObject);
begin
  //Only execute this event once ...
  OnActivate := nil;

  //and then using the code David Heffernan offered ...
  with TMyOtherForm.Create(nil) do begin
    try
      ShowModal;
    finally
      Free;
    end;
end;

Setting the event to nil will ensure that this code is only run once, at startup.

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The OnShow event is fired immediately before the call to the Windows API function ShowWindow is made. It is this call to ShowWindow that actually results in the window appearing on the screen.

So you ideally need something to run immediately after the call to ShowWindow. It turns out that the VCL code that drives all this is inside a TCustomForm message handler for CM_SHOWINGCHANGED. That message handler fires the OnShow event and then calls ShowWindow. So an excellent solution is to show your modal form immediately after the handler for CM_SHOWINGCHANGED runs. Like this:

type
  TMyMainForm = class(TForm)
  private
    FMyOtherFormHasBeenShown: Boolean;
  protected
    procedure CMShowingChanged(var Message: TMessage); message CM_SHOWINGCHANGED;
  end;

.....

procedure TMyMainForm.CMShowingChanged(var Message: TMessage);
begin
  inherited;
  if Showing and not FMyOtherFormHasBeenShown then begin
    FMyOtherFormHasBeenShown := True;
    with TMyOtherForm.Create(nil) do begin
      try
        ShowModal;
      finally
        Free;
      end;
    end;
  end;
end;
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