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I have the following class hierarchy:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self, filename, x):
        self.x = x
        # initialize A from filename

    # rest of A's methods

class B(A):
    def __init__(self, filename):
        super(B, self).__init__(filename, 10)

    # rest of B's methods

Both classes are passed the name of a file in their __init__ methods. The file contents are then used to initialize some data in the objects.

To facilitate testing I'd like to be able to construct an A or B instance by passing it the data directly, rather than having the object read from a file. I thought that a pair of factory functions, each implemented using a classmethod might work, but I've been unable to get the versions in B to work at all. Here's what I have so far:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self, x):
        self.x = x

    @classmethod
    def construct(cls, filename, x):
        a = cls(x)
        # initialize a from filename
        return a

    @classmethod
    def test_construct(cls, data, x):
        a = cls(x)
        # initialize a from data
        return a

class B(A):
    def __init__(self):
        super(B, self).__init__(10)

    @classmethod
    def construct(cls, filename):
        # should construct B from filename

    @classmethod
    def test_construct(cls, data):
        # should construct B from data
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For the class methods in B to call their superclass class methods, you just use super() as though you were calling an instance in a base class:

class B(A):
    def __init__(self):
        super(B, self).__init__(10)

    @classmethod
    def construct(cls, filename):
        # should construct B from filename
        return super(B, cls).construct(filename, 10)

Edit: As you point out in your comment, there is then a problem because you've added an argument to the base class constructor. You should avoid making incompatible changes in method signatures between base and sub-classes: a B instance is an A instance so it should accept any method call you can make to the A instance.

One option:

class B(A):
    def __init__(self, x=10):
        # if you're paranoid insert `assert x==10` here
        super(B, self).__init__(x)

    @classmethod
    def construct(cls, filename):
        # should construct B from filename
        return super(B, cls).construct(filename, 10)

and now it works again, but you have to trust yourself not to pass 'x' to directly constructed instances of B. Probably better would be to lose the x entirely from __init__ which it looks like you could do by making it a class attribute or by setting it separately after construction.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think this works. When A.construct is called from B.construct in this way, cls is bound to B. In the first line of A.construct the statement a = cls(x) tries to make a B, not an A. –  stw Jan 19 '12 at 14:48
    
@stw, Fair point, I forgot about your __init__ having an incompatible signature. I've extended my answer to reflect that. –  Duncan Jan 19 '12 at 15:20

the data at __init__.

You can make that optional and use filename in your program and data in your test:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self, x, filename=None, data=None):
        if not any((filename, data)):
            raise TypeError('either filename or data needs to be provided')
        if all((filename, data)):
            raise TypeError("both filename and data can't be provided")

        self.x = x
        if filename:
            with open(filename, 'r') as f:
                data = f.read()     # just an example

Edit: Anyway if you want use special constructors method, this is how I would it:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self, data, x):
        self.x = x
        self.data = data

    @classmethod
    def construct(cls, filename, x):
        with open(filename, 'r') as f:
            data = f.read()
        return cls(data, x)

class B(A):
    def __init__(self, data):
        super(B, self).__init__(data, 10)

    @classmethod
    def construct(cls, filename):
        with open(filename, 'r') as f:
            data = f.read()
        # modify data as you wish
        return cls(data)

Where you call construct in your program and __init__ in your test.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your suggestion. I considered something like this, but it doesn't have the right semantics. Both filename and data are optional, so it looks like you should be able to make an A without providing either, or perhaps both! I wanted to make a clean separation between client code (which calls construct), and test code (which calls test_construct). –  stw Jan 19 '12 at 13:53
    
@stw: You just need to add a couple of check to prevent the user from an imporer use of your class (I've added them). I've also updated my answer using your construct. –  Rik Poggi Jan 19 '12 at 14:10
    
Thanks - I like the idea of only having one factory function (using __init__ for tests). In the original hierarchy the base class handles all of the initialization of the data. The subclass simply passes the filename on in its __init__ method. Is it possible to have B.construct call A.construct (in a similar way that B.__init__ calls A.__init__)? –  stw Jan 19 '12 at 14:21
    
@stw: The only way to make it work is using A.contruct(filename, 10), because with super(B, cls).construct(filename, 10) you call A.construct but with cls = B so you are bounced back to B.__init__. (If you like it maybe you want to think about up-vote it?) –  Rik Poggi Jan 19 '12 at 14:53

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