Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We have the concept of pointers in C++. Now if we allocate some memory in C++ and pass it on to Java as an object reference(using JNI) then who should be and who will be freeing it.

Will it be

1.)The Garbage collector does it automatically in Java?

2.)We need to explicitly do a delete on the pointer in the wrapped JNI class finalize method?

3.)Or we should just forget finalize(as finalizers cannot be trusted) and it is responsibility of Java to call a C++ code which deletes the object

4.)Or is there some way to deallocate the memory directly in Java itself (not sure how Java intreprets a C++ pointer inorder to delete it)?

What is the best practice for doing this and vice versa(when we pass objects from Java to C++)?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

We have the concept of pointers in C++. Now if we allocate some memory in C++ and pass it on to Java as an object reference(using JNI) then who should be and who will be freeing it.

The best strategy is usually to have the allocator also be the one to free the data.

1.)The Garbage collector does it automatically in Java?

The problem with this is you don't know when, if ever it will run.

2.)We need to explicitly do a delete on the pointer in the wrapped JNI class finalize method?

Better to have a release() method in Java rather than imply that C++ has to delete it. You may want C++ to recycle the memory.

3.)Or we should just forget finalize(as finalizers cannot be trusted) and it is responsibility of Java to call a C++ code which deletes the object

If you mean, allocate the memory in Java and pass it to C++ to populate. This is my preference.

I would use can use ByteBuffer.allocateDirect() and you can call ((DirectBuffer) buffer).cleaner().clean(); to clean it up deterministically.

This can make recycling the memory simpler, possibly the same buffer can be used for the life of the application.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 definitely the allocator should be the one to release, and allocating Java-side (if possible) is "cleaner". –  Viruzzo Jan 19 '12 at 13:29
    
I agree its cleaner, esp if Java calls C++ rather than they other way around. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 19 '12 at 13:32
1  
As long as it's only memory we are freeing I usually just write a small java wrapper around the c++ resource and use the finalizer to call the release method there - extremely simple and fool proof. The only problem are resources we want to release deterministically, but then we have the same problem and solutions for normal Java as well. –  Voo Jan 19 '12 at 14:13
1  
Sure, or just calling the native release function will also be deterministically - the problem is deciding WHEN I can call the function. But then in my experience I never had complicated scenarios where just calling close() wouldn't have worked (now much nicer with java7 syntax). And most of the time I don't hold resources in my C++ code that need to be cleaned up deterministically anyhow so I go for the simplest solution. –  Voo Jan 19 '12 at 14:23
1  
I go for the simplest solution. agreed, its more likely to work that way.;) –  Peter Lawrey Jan 19 '12 at 14:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.