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I have a C++ class Archive with a member function extractData(). This function calls realExtractData(), which is implemented in a separate C library.

I want to pass the extractData() function a pair of FILE * instances that are usually stdout and stderr, but I want to provide the option of custom file pointers, as well:

class Archive {
    public:
        ...
        int extractData(string id, FILE *customOut, FILE *customErr);
        ...
};

int
Archive::extractData(string id, FILE *customOut, FILE *customErr)
{
    if (realExtractData(id.c_str(), customOut) != EXIT_SUCCESS) {
        fprintf(stderr, "something went wrong...\n");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

If I call the above as listed, there is no delay in outputting data to standard output. All extracted data get sent to standard output (stdout) almost immediately:

FILE *outFp = stdout;
FILE *errFp = stderr;
Archive *archive = new Archive(inFilename);

if (archive->extractData(id, outFp, errFp) != EXIT_SUCCESS) {
    fprintf(errFp, "[error] - could not extract %s\n", archive->getInFnCStr());
    return EXIT_FAILURE;
}

If I change extractData() so that its fprintf() call uses customErr:

int
Archive::extractData(string id, FILE *customOut, FILE *customErr)
{
    if (realExtractData(id.c_str(), customOut) != EXIT_SUCCESS) {
        fprintf(customErr, "something went wrong...\n");  /* <-- changed this line */
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

...then when I run the binary, the binary seems to hang in processing input and printing to standard output.

If I change fprintf() back to using stderr and not customErr, things once again work properly, i.e., data are flushed to standard output (my customOut) immediately.

Is this a buffering issue? Is there a way to fix this?

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1 Answer 1

"stderr and not customErr"

Standard error is un-buffered which means it prints out almost immediately. other output streams are buffered unless you're using low-level OS calls, which means they will take longer to print unless you do a buffer flush with something like an endl, ::flush, or whatever else.

If you want to go for the low-level OS calls and you're working with unix, check this out:

http://www.annrich.com/cs590/notes/cs590_lecture_2.pdf

I haven't read the whole thing, but on scanning it it looks as if it has similar info to the good Stevens Advanced Programming in Unix book which defitely talks through this.

share|improve this answer
    
Where would I place a fflush() call? If I place it after the fprintf() statement, it doesn't seem to fix the hang. –  Alex Reynolds Jan 19 '12 at 14:01
    
Honestly, I'd try getting rid of the fprintf in favor of doing a straight up unbuffered write() call as mentioned in that link. That's the only way I think it'd be as fast as a std::cerr/stderr printout. –  w00te Jan 19 '12 at 15:09

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