Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I create two dialogs:
DialogA: setVisible(true) called only once.
DialogB: setVisible(true) and setAlwaysOnTop(true) called every 1,5 sec

Windows: Each call to dialogB.setAlwaysOnTop(true) brings dialogA AND dialogB to the front.
OSX: Each call to dialogB.setAlwaysOnTop(true) brings only dialogB to the front. (Expected Behaviour)

Test Case (Windows):

1 I start the application from my IDE.
2 I see DialogA.
3 I click in the IDE and DialogA disappears.
4 After one second DialogA and DialogB will show up.
5 I click in the IDE and DialogA and DialogB disappears. GOTO 4

Expected Behaviour(OSX):
4. After one second DialogB will show up.
5. I click in the IDE and DialogB disappears. GOTO 4

Question:
How do I get the expected behaviour under Windows?

import javax.swing.JDialog;
import javax.swing.JLabel;
public class JDialogSetAlwaysonTopTEST
{
public static void main(String[] p_Strings)
{
    final JDialog dialogA = new JDialog();
    dialogA.setLocation(0, 0);
    dialogA.add(new JLabel("DialogA: Click on the overlapped   window"));       
    java.awt.EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {           
        public void run() {
            dialogA.pack();
            dialogA.setVisible(true);
        }
    });

    try {Thread.sleep(3000);} catch (InterruptedException e){}

    final JDialog dialogB = new JDialog();
    dialogB.setLocation(70, 70);
    dialogB.add(new JLabel("DialogB:  Do you see DialogA?"));

    java.awt.EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {           
        public void run() {
            dialogB.pack();
            dialogB.setVisible(true);
        }
    });

    while(true)
    {
        java.awt.EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable()  {                  
            public void run() {
                dialogB.setAlwaysOnTop(true);  //prerequisite
                dialogB.setVisible(true);
                dialogB.setAlwaysOnTop(false); //prerequisite
            }
        });         
        try {Thread.sleep(1500);} catch (InterruptedException e){}
    }       
}
}
share|improve this question
    
Don't know if it will make a difference, but you could start by respecting Swing's thread policy, and only use Swing components from the EDT. –  JB Nizet Jan 19 '12 at 15:27
2  
You're still creating and modifying swing components in the main thread. Everything except the sleeping must be done on the EDT. –  JB Nizet Jan 19 '12 at 15:54
    
You are right! But the result remains the same. –  Peter Jan 19 '12 at 15:59
    
@JBNizet: I think the code is ok considering EDT [link]java.sun.com/products/jfc/tsc/articles/threads/threads1.html –  Peter Jan 19 '12 at 16:14
    
No it isn't. Read docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/javax/swing/…. The article you linked to dates from 1998 and is obsolete. –  JB Nizet Jan 19 '12 at 16:16

1 Answer 1

I found a "dirty" solution to my problem.

final JDialog dialogA = new JDialog(new JFrame());
...
final JDialog dialogB = new JDialog(new JFrame());

If each dialog has an independent owner dialogB.setAlwaysOnTop(true), dialogB.setVisible(true) does not effect dialogA

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.