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When using the module pattern in javascript how should constructors be defined, if at all. I would like my constructor to fit into a standard module pattern and not be global.

Why doesn't something like this work, is it complete and total nonsense?

var HOUSE = function() {
    return {
        Person: function() {
            var self = this;
            self.name = "john";
            function name() {
                return self.name;
            }
        }
    };
}();

var me = new HOUSE.Person();
alert(me.name());
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self.name is a string "john" so you can't invoke it. Note that your local function name is not exported anywhere. –  Raynos Jan 19 '12 at 16:29
    
Updated question, but it made a perfectly good answer make no sense so changed it back. –  zode64 Jan 19 '12 at 16:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to bring the method out, and attach it to the Person prototype. But when you do, you'll have a name property, and a name method, which won't work, so consider renaming the latter

HOUSE.Person.prototype.getName = function(){
    return this.name;
}

OR, you could just attach it to this, and make getName a privileged method:

  Person: function() {
        this.name = "john";
        this.getName = function() {
            return this.name;
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I think there you have a little syntax issue. :) –  pimvdb Jan 19 '12 at 16:26
    
So assigning var self = this so I this doesn't change is not required? –  zode64 Jan 19 '12 at 16:29
    
Also is this thought of as good practice? –  zode64 Jan 19 '12 at 16:30
    
@pimvdb - got it (I think) - thanks! –  Adam Rackis Jan 19 '12 at 16:30
1  
@whatsthebeef - assigning var self = this would definitely be a good idea if you were keeping that private function (what you defined as function name()) - when that private function were to be called, this would be the window object, so to get the "actualy" this, you'd save it to self, which the private func would close over. But since you really want this name function to be a public method, you no longer need that self variable –  Adam Rackis Jan 19 '12 at 16:31

Your code is almost fine. However the function name() was not public but the variable was so you were trying to execute the variable causing an error. Add the function getName onto the object and call that instead:

var HOUSE = function() {
    return {
        Person: function() {
            var self = this;
            self.name = "john";
            self.getName = function() {
                return self.name;
            }
        }
    };
}();

var me = new HOUSE.Person();
alert(me.getName());

http://jsfiddle.net/8nSbP/

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1  
Is this thought of as good practice? –  zode64 Jan 19 '12 at 16:31

Using var and function foo() {} (the latter as a declaration, which means "just" function foo() {} without assigning it), create local symbols. So, the function is not available outside the constructor.

Whatever you want to expose (make public), you should assign to this (or self since you defined self = this):

self.getName = function() {
    return self.name;
};

Note that you already used name, so I gave function another name. If you wanted to make the name string local, and expose the function, then they can have the same name since there is no conflict. E.g.:

var name = "john";

self.name = function() {
    return name;
};
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