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This question is related with one of my earlier questions..

Previous Post

In there the blocking nature is mentioned as an advantage.

I tried to develop some simple code to demonstrate the blocking nature but I got stuck. I just tried to make a BlockingQueue of size 4 and tried to add 5 elements and ended up with a java.lang.IllegalStateException. Can someone show me a code example for blocking nature of BlockingQueue?


public static void main(String[] args) {
    BlockingQueue<String> bq = new LinkedBlockingQueue<String>(4);

    try {
        bq.offer("A");
        bq.offer("B");
        bq.offer("C");
        bq.offer("D");
        bq.offer("E");

        System.out.println("1 = " + bq.take());
        System.out.println("2 = " + bq.take());
        System.out.println("3 = " + bq.take());
        System.out.println("4 = " + bq.take());
        System.out.println("5 = " + bq.take());
        System.out.println("6 = " + bq.take());
    } catch (Exception e) {
        // TODO: handle exception
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

I used this code segment. In this case I am trying to put 5 elements to a queue with size 4. In this case 4 elements (A,B,C,D) should be added to queue. Then I am calling take() method while printing. Shouldn't "E" be inserted automatically to the queue when I call System.out.println("1 = " + bq.take()); ? Because it gets one free slot?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Were you adding with add, offer, or put? I assume you were using add, since it is the only one that can throw an IllegalStateException; but if you read the table, you'll see that if you want blocking semantics, you should be using put (and take to remove).

Edit: There are a couple of problems with your example.

First I'll answer the question "Why doesn't E get inserted when I call take() the first time?" The answer is that by the time you call take(), you have already tried and failed to insert E. There is then nothing to insert once the space has been freed.

Now if you changed offer() to put(), put("E") will never return. Why? Because it's waiting for some other thread to remove an element from the queue. Remember, BlockingQueues are designed for multiple threads to access. Blocking is useless (actually worse than useless) if you have a single-threaded application.

Here is an improved example:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    final BlockingQueue<String> bq = new LinkedBlockingQueue<String>(4);

    Runnable producer = new Runnable() {
        public void run() {
            try {
                bq.put("A");
                bq.put("B");
                bq.put("C");
                bq.put("D");
                bq.put("E");
            } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
                Thread.currentThread().interrupt(); 
            }
        }
    };
    Runnable consumer = new Runnable() {
        public void run() {
            try {
                System.out.println("1 = " + bq.take());
                System.out.println("2 = " + bq.take());
                System.out.println("3 = " + bq.take());
                System.out.println("4 = " + bq.take());
                System.out.println("5 = " + bq.take());
                System.out.println("6 = " + bq.take());
            } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
                Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
            }
        }
    };
    new Thread(producer).start();
    new Thread(consumer).start();
}

Now the put("E") call will actually succeed, since it can now wait until the consumer thread removes "A" from the queue. The last take() will still block infinitely, since there is no sixth element to remove.

share|improve this answer
    
Previously I used Add + Poll. But at the moment I am trying out put + Take –  Chathuranga Chandrasekara May 21 '09 at 14:10
    
Hmm.... Got the point.. Experimenting now :) –  Chathuranga Chandrasekara May 21 '09 at 14:35
    
How should I specify the timeout for the PUT()? –  Chathuranga Chandrasekara May 21 '09 at 14:53
2  
Put doesn't have a timeout; if you need a timeout, use offer. –  Adam Jaskiewicz May 21 '09 at 15:10
    
+1 for excellent explanation. –  devnull Apr 16 '13 at 12:29

mmyers beat me to it :P (+1)
that should be what you need, good luck!

NOTE: put() will fail in your example because put() will block until space is available. Since space is never available, the program never continues execution.

==== old answer======

a BlockingQueue is an interface, you'll have to use one of the implementating classes.

The "Blocking Nature" simply states that you can request something from your queue, and if it is empty, the thread it is in will block (wait) until something gets added to the queue and then continue processing.

ArrayBlockingQueue
DelayQueue
LinkedBlockingQueue
PriorityBlockingQueue
SynchronousQueue

http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/BlockingQueue.html

//your main collection
LinkedBlockingQueue<Integer> lbq = new LinkedBlockingQueue<Integer>();

//Add your values
lbq.put(100);
lbq.put(200);

//take() will actually remove the first value from the collection, 
//or block if no value exists yet.
//you will either have to interrupt the blocking, 
//or insert something into the queue for the program execution to continue

int currVal = 0;
try {
    currVal = lbq.take();
} catch (InterruptedException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

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Thanks.. I used "LinkedBlockingQueue" –  Chathuranga Chandrasekara May 21 '09 at 13:59
    
awesome, is that everything you needed? I'm working on an example right now if you still want me to post it –  Robert Greiner May 21 '09 at 14:01
    
Better you post it. Just a short example :) –  Chathuranga Chandrasekara May 21 '09 at 14:02
    
alright, that is a very simple syntax example. Let me know if you need any other help. Good luck! –  Robert Greiner May 21 '09 at 14:07
1  
This won't work. You need to use put if you want it to block, or offer if you want it to return if it can't add the element. –  Adam Jaskiewicz May 21 '09 at 14:09

To specifically answer your question: Offer is a nonblocking offer call, so in a single threaded method like the one you posted, the call to offer('E') simply returns false without modifying the full queue. If you used the blocking put('E') call, it would sleep until space became available. Forever in your simple example. You would need to have a separate thread reading off of the queue to create space for the put to complete.

share|improve this answer
    
replaces offer with put but failed. Do i need to use a seperate thread for PUT() the items? –  Chathuranga Chandrasekara May 21 '09 at 14:27
    
In my answer, I said: You would need to have a separate thread reading off of the queue to create space for the put to complete. –  lostlogic May 21 '09 at 14:36
    
Yes. Got the point :) –  Chathuranga Chandrasekara May 21 '09 at 14:43

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