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When I store this class:

class MyClass{
    ...
    public Type SomeType {get;set;} 
    ...
}

SomeType property gets serialized like this:

"SomeType" : {
    "_t" : "RuntimeType"
}

and every subsequent query fails.

I'm using the official C# driver. How do I get it to store the actual Type? Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Here's a sample serializer for System.Type that serializes the name of the Type as a BSON string. This has some limitations in that the Deserialize method fails if the type name is not a system type or in the same assembly, but you could tweak this sample serializer to write the AssemblyQualifiedName instead.

public class TypeSerializer : IBsonSerializer
{
    public object Deserialize(BsonReader reader, Type nominalType, IBsonSerializationOptions options)
    {
        var actualType = nominalType;
        return Deserialize(reader, nominalType, actualType, options);
    }

    public object Deserialize(BsonReader reader, Type nominalType, Type actualType, IBsonSerializationOptions options)
    {
        if (reader.CurrentBsonType == BsonType.Null)
        {
            return null;
        }
        else
        {
            var fullName = reader.ReadString();
            return Type.GetType(fullName);
        }
    }

    public bool GetDocumentId(object document, out object id, out Type idNominalType, out IIdGenerator idGenerator)
    {
        throw new InvalidOperationException();
    }

    public void Serialize(BsonWriter writer, Type nominalType, object value, IBsonSerializationOptions options)
    {
        if (value == null)
        {
            writer.WriteNull();
        }
        else
        {
            writer.WriteString(((Type)value).FullName);
        }
    }

    public void SetDocumentId(object document, object id)
    {
        throw new InvalidOperationException();
    }
}

The trick is to get it registered properly. You need to register it for both System.Type and System.RuntimeType, but System.RuntimeType is not public so you can't refer to it in your code. But you can get at it using Type.GetType. Here's the code to register the serializer:

var typeSerializer = new TypeSerializer();
BsonSerializer.RegisterSerializer(typeof(Type), typeSerializer);
BsonSerializer.RegisterSerializer(Type.GetType("System.RuntimeType"), typeSerializer);

I used this test loop to verify that it worked:

var types = new Type[] { typeof(int), typeof(string), typeof(Guid), typeof(C) };
foreach (var type in types)
{
    var json = type.ToJson();
    Console.WriteLine(json);
    var rehydratedType = BsonSerializer.Deserialize<Type>(json);
    Console.WriteLine("{0} -> {1}", type.FullName, rehydratedType.FullName);
}

where C is just an empty class:

public static class C
{
}
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Excellent, this really helped, thanks –  joe Jan 6 '14 at 14:50

Serializing System.Type is not supported (at least not presently). You will have to store the type name as a string instead.

Alternatively, you could write a serializer for System.Type and register it, but that might be more work than simply storing the type name as a string.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Robert. I already did it by storing type name, but I'd rather do it with custom serializer. Unfortunately, I couldn't find an example of how to write one. –  Viet Norm Jan 19 '12 at 18:04
    
I tried to write a sample serializer for System.Type, but I don't think it's possible. Turns out that System.Type is an abstract base class, but the concrete class System.RuntimeType that derives from it is not publicly visible. Since our code can't see System.RuntimeType we can't register a serializer for System.RuntimeType. –  Robert Stam Jan 21 '12 at 5:38
    
Just thought of a hack to register a serializer for System.RuntimeType. I'm adding a new answer to describe it. –  Robert Stam Jan 21 '12 at 5:41

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