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I've been working with some abstract classes and something feels off but I'm not sure what to do about it. Here's a simple example to explain my question:

public abstract class Data
{
    protected Boolean _Connected = false;

    public abstract void Connect();
    public abstract void Disconnect();

    public Boolean Connected
    {
        get { return _Connected; }
    }

}

public class SqlServerData : Data
{
    public override void Connect()
    {
        // code to connect to sql server
        _Connected = true;
    }
    public override void Disconnect()
    {
        if (_Connected)
        {
            // code to disconnect from sql server
            _Connected = false;
        }
    }    
}

I have a couple problems with the design.

  1. Nothing in this design forces a new implementation of Data to do anything with the _connected instance variable. If other classes using the Data class rely on the Connected property, it may not be accurate.

  2. It can be confusing to someone new to this code. This sample is pretty simple but if there are more instance variables in the abstract class and other instance variables in the SqlServerData class it will be more difficult to know where the variables are defined.

So my question is, should this be refactored and if so, how?

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2  
You can always fully qualify the variables (base.variableName for base classes and this.variableName for derived class variables). –  Code on the Commode Jan 19 '12 at 17:26
3  
What does a connect method in a "Data" class? That is where the problem starts imho. I wouldnt expect to implement anything like "Connect" if I inherit a class called "Data". –  Nappy Jan 19 '12 at 17:27
    
@CodeontheCommode - I like that solution for the clarity problem. –  allen.mn Jan 19 '12 at 17:39
    
@Nappy - It's my attempt at naming an abstract class that allows for multiple ways to get and update data. I need it to implement SQL Server, Excel (ug), DB2, and possibly flat files down the road. I wanted the same to be generic enough to describe any of those. I'm all ears for a better name or way to split it up :) –  allen.mn Jan 19 '12 at 17:43
    
You might just make the "Connected" property abstract and remove the field. –  Nappy Jan 19 '12 at 17:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Implement the state machine (connected or not connected, and the transitions between these states) in the base class, so the derived class doesn't have to worry about this part. Provide protected methods for the actual functionality, so the derived class can easily fill in the "holes":

public abstract class Data
{
    private bool connected;

    public bool Connected
    {
        get { return connected; }
    }

    public void Connect()
    {
        OnConnect();
        connected = true;
    }

    public void Disconnect()
    {
        if (connected)
        {
            OnDisconnect();
            connected = false;
        }
    }

    protected virtual void OnConnect() { }

    protected virtual void OnDisconnect() { }
}

and

public class SqlServerData : Data
{
    protected override void OnConnect()
    {
        // code to connect to sql server
    }

    protected override void OnDisconnect()
    {
        // code to disconnect from sql server
    }    
}
share|improve this answer
    
That make so much sense once I see it! Manage the base variable in the base methods then call secondary methods to do the specific work in the child classes. Thanks for the answer. –  allen.mn Jan 19 '12 at 17:47

The problem is that you want the logic to manage the _connected flag to be shared amongst all subclasses, but still retain the ability for each subclass to provide its own implementation of what happens when you actually call Connect() and Disconnect(). For this I would recommend what's called a Template Method Pattern, so that the abstract base class can still retain some control over the logic used in the method. The way it works is pretty simple, just structure your class similar to this:

public void Connect() {
   if(!_connected) {
      ExecuteConnect();
      _connected = true;
   }
}

public void Disconnect() { 
   if(_connected) {
      ExecuteDisconnect();
      _connected = false;
   }
 }

 protected abstract void ExecuteConnect();
 protected abstract void ExecuteDisconnect();

Now in your base classes you can override the Execute* methods (I'm sure the naming convention can be improved) so that you can provide new implementations to Connecting and Disconnecting, while still managing control over the general algorithm.

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Thanks! I've been working through a list of patterns and I haven't gotten to Template Method yet. That makes a lot of sense. –  allen.mn Jan 19 '12 at 17:48

I would rather make the property Connected abstract and ommit the protected field.

The disadvantage of protected fields is that the base and the children have to use it in a consistent way, thus coupling them stronger together.

But having the protected field might save you some simple lines of code. It depends on the actual problem, but generally I would rather write a few more lines of code then introduce coupling.

share|improve this answer
    
My goal is to use the child classes polymorphically so in this case I want the property to work the same way for all children. –  allen.mn Jan 19 '12 at 19:23
    
I guess in all but simple cases the pattern of dtb is better. –  DanT Jan 19 '12 at 20:46

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