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I thought I ran into a bug with MySQL 5.1, but the bug was in the perl code that's creating the timestamps. perl's localtime uses 0-11 for months, but MySQL's datetime uses 1-12. So, I've got all these malformed timestamps that I need to update.

2012-00-19 09:03:30

This should be:

2012-01-19 09:03:30

The problem is that the date functions for MySQL return NULL on a 00 month. Is there a way to do this in MySQL?

EDIT: Solution =

 UPDATE test_stats 
 SET start_time = CAST(CONCAT(SUBSTRING(start_time, 1, 5), 
                       CAST((CAST(SUBSTRING(start_time, 6, 2) AS UNSIGNED) + 1) AS CHAR(2)),
                       SUBSTRING(start_time, 8, 12)) AS DATETIME);

By the way, I was using MySQL 5.1

share|improve this question
2  
OK, I love Perl, but who thought it was a good idea to zero-index months? –  Jesse Smith Jan 19 '12 at 18:14
    
You could try using the dateadd function in MySQL to add a month to each entry. I'm not sure what would happen in the null cases; you'd have to try it on the MySQL command line to find out. –  Jonah Bishop Jan 19 '12 at 18:21
1  
Perl's gmtime/localtime essentially takes Unix's struct tm as its parameter, and struct tm has zero-indexed months. This is a fairly infamous Perl gotcha, but it's really Unix's fault. –  Peter Corlett Jan 19 '12 at 18:30
7  
@JesseSmith Perl will do what you tell it to do. It is zero-indexed so it will be more compatible with conversion by array index, e.g. $month = $months[$month] (See perldoc -f localtime). That's raw data, not meant to be used directly in a timestamp. If you still do that, that's not perl's fault, it's your fault. –  TLP Jan 19 '12 at 18:35
1  
@TLP Good point! Date math is quite quirky at the best of times, though. I guess this is what we get for trying to manipulate dates directly. –  Jesse Smith Jan 19 '12 at 20:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This should work:

UPDATE MyTable
SET DateTimeField = 
    CAST (
     SUBSTRING(DateTimeString, 1, 5) -- '2012-'
   + CAST((CAST(SUBSTRING(DateTimeString, 6, 2) AS INT) + 1) AS VARCHAR) -- '00' => '1'
   + SUBSTRING(DateTimeString, 8, 12) -- '-19 09:03:30'
   AS DATETIME)

Test with this select

DECLARE @x VARCHAR(50) = '2012-00-19 09:03:30'

SELECT CAST(SUBSTRING(@x, 1, 5) 
     + CAST((CAST(SUBSTRING(@x, 6, 2) AS INT) + 1) AS VARCHAR) 
     + SUBSTRING(@x, 8, 12) AS DATETIME)
share|improve this answer
    
So, this will update any 00 month, right? To increment all month values, as they are all currently stored as 0-11, I'd first have to update and increment every non-00 month, right? –  kjprice Jan 19 '12 at 18:44
    
yes, this will increment the months 0 => 1, 1 => 2, ...., 11 => 12 –  Bassam Mehanni Jan 19 '12 at 18:46
    
Let's see, can I test it first by doing a select: SELECT CAST ( SUBSTRING(DateTimeString, 1, 5) -- '2012-' + CAST((CAST(SUBSTRING(DateTimeString, 6, 2) AS INT) + 1) AS VARCHAR) -- '00' => '1' + SUBSTRING(DateTimeString, 8, 12) -- '-19 09:03:30' AS DATETIME) FROM MyTable; ? –  kjprice Jan 19 '12 at 18:47
    
@kjprice I added a select for you to be able to test it –  Bassam Mehanni Jan 19 '12 at 18:50
    
I'm confused by the update statement: DateTimeField and DateTimeString. To be clear: if I have a field called start_time, I would substitute both DateTimeField and DateTimeString with start_time? –  kjprice Jan 19 '12 at 19:02

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