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I have looked for answers on here and have not found anything that directly can help me so I am going to ask here. I have a form with multiple select boxes:

<select name="acabados[]">
<option value="1">ABC</option>
<option value="2">DEF</option>
<option value="3">GHI</option>
</select>

<select name="acabados[]">
<option value="1">ABC</option>
<option value="2">DEF</option>
<option value="3">GHI</option>
</select>

As you can see they are the exact same select box. I have told the client to use select multiple but he wants it this way. The user can add as many as these select boxes as they desire (so it could be up to 20 select boxes at a time) and I need to get the value (1 or 2 or 3) and the text inside the option. It is then an array that I need to break down cause I need to add the total values of the select boxes in php. I could either use jquery for collecting the values or php, which ever is easier. Thank you in advance for any help!!

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AFAIK this approach will not yield the results you need - I am fairly certain that whichever select is set last will occupy the value of $_POST["acabados"] (PHP). You might be able to use jQuery if you give each select a unique id attribute value. –  Brian Driscoll Jan 19 '12 at 18:40
    
how do you generate those select boxes? also, what are you asking for? how to manage the acabados[] vector? how to get the values of each select box in jquery? –  Andreu Heineken Jan 19 '12 at 18:40
    
@Brian: No, it works in PHP. See the demo in my answer. –  animuson Jan 19 '12 at 18:45
    
@BrianDriscoll The format of the select elements in the question is correct. Adding [] to the end of the name adds the element's value to an array when posting to PHP. –  Jasper Jan 19 '12 at 18:47
    
@animuson I stand corrected then. :) –  Brian Driscoll Jan 19 '12 at 18:47
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4 Answers

$(function () {
    var $select = $('select');
    $select.on('change', function () {
        var output = 0;
        for (var i = 0, len = $select.length; i < len; i++) {
            output += parseInt($select.eq(i).val());
        }
        //the `output` variable now contains the addition of all the values from the `acabados[]` select elements
    });
});

Here is a demo: http://jsfiddle.net/aPXXA/1/

You can change var $select = $('select'); to var $select = $('[name="acabados[]"]'); to only select the select elements with the acabados[] name attribute.

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Try this, it will work for dynamically created select elements too.

$(document).on('change', 'select[name="acabados[]"]', function(){
    var total = 0;
    $('select[name="acabados[]"]').each(function(){
        total += parseInt($(this).val());
    });
});

total var will contain the total of all the select elements selected value.

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This is pretty much the same answer I posted but the for(var i = 0, len = $selects.length; i < len; i++) {} runs a lot faster than .each(). Also, $.each() will run faster that .each(): jsperf.com/jquery-each-vs-for-loops/2 (it's actually kind of amazing how much faster a properly formatted for loop is). Event delegation could be good if necessary but if it isn't necessary then it creates unnecessary overhead with all the event bubbling. Just things to keep in mind. –  Jasper Jan 19 '12 at 18:49
    
@Jasper - For dynamically created elements this is the way to go, take help of event bubbling. At the same time it attaches only one event handler no matter whatever number of elements. –  ShankarSangoli Jan 19 '12 at 19:01
    
Event delegation is cheaper when binding (only has to bind to one element) but is more expensive when the events fire. Here is a jsperf I made to demonstrate the performance difference between delegation and binding: jsperf.com/jquery-delegate-vs-bind-triggering/2 –  Jasper Jan 19 '12 at 19:10
    
Yes I agree with you if it is only for a single element. But in OP's scenario there can be 20 select elements so event delegation makes sense and moreover if the elements are added dynamically then this solution is the best. –  ShankarSangoli Jan 19 '12 at 19:13
    
The performance test I linked to doesn't use just 1 element, it uses close to 100 elements (and each one gets a triggered event every loop of the performance test). Notice that non-delegation performs about twice as fast in this situation (even though it takes less time to actually bind the event handler using delegation). As I stated in my first comment, event delegation isn't innately "bad", it has it's place, but that place is for dynamically created elements (where you can't bind to the elements directly when they are added to the DOM). –  Jasper Jan 19 '12 at 19:19
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If you want to retrieve the values in PHP, you can just use $_POST['acabados'] and it will contain all the values selected in each menu. See a demo. As long as you include the [] after the name, it will compound all the values for any element with that name into a single array. You can even mix select menus, inputs, and textareas together!

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Why not just give them different id's and do the count in jquery/javascript. Alternatively give them all the same class, and do .each() to grab the values in all of them.

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