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I have looked, but couldn't find a definitive answer for some of my exception questions, especially regarding C# best practices.

Perhaps I will always be confused about the best way to use exceptions, I ran across this article which basically says 'always use exceptions, never use error codes or properties' http://www.eggheadcafe.com/articles/20060612.asp. I'll definitely buy that, but here's my dilemma:

I have a function 'caller' which calls 'callee'. 'callee' performs a few different things, each of which might throw the same type of exception. How do I relay meaningful information back to 'caller' about what 'callee' was doing at the time of the exception?

I could throw a new exception like below, but I'm worried I'll mess up the stacktrace which is bad:

//try to log in and get SomeException  
catch(SomeException ex)
{
  throw new SomeException("Login failed", ex);
}

...

//try to send a file and get SomeException
catch(SomeException ex)
{
    throw new SomeException("Sending file failed", ex):
}

Thanks, Mark

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2  
Exceptions bubble up the call stack automatically. You don't have to rethrow them. –  Cody Gray Jan 19 '12 at 19:04
    
@CodyGray The reason for rethrowing is to add information so that the caller can differentiate between them. If I remote the try/catch from the callee, then the caller won't know which operation out of multiple operations caused the exception. –  MStodd Jan 19 '12 at 19:12
1  
I don't understand why the callee wouldn't just throw an exception containing information about what it was doing. The caller shouldn't know what the callee is doing anyway! –  Cody Gray Jan 19 '12 at 19:15
    
Can you show an example of where the caller would need to distinguish between exceptions? Will the caller be doing different things depending on the exception? –  John Saunders Jan 19 '12 at 19:43
    
Not controlling execution flow, but simply wants to relay more information back to the UI than can be gleaned from the thrown exception. –  MStodd Jan 19 '12 at 19:54

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In scenarios like this I usually inject a logger and log the specific error and rethrow the original exception:

//try to log in and get SomeException  
catch(SomeException ex)
{
    logger.LogError("Login failed");
    throw;
}

...

//try to send a file and get SomeException
catch(SomeException ex)
{
    logger.LogError("Sending file failed");
    throw;
}

The throw; will keep the original stack trace alive (as opposed to throw ex; which will create a new stacktrace).

Edit

Depending on what your actual code is doing it could make sense to actually break callee up into several calls (Login(), SendFile(), etc.), so caller is performing the individual steps instead of calling one big method which is doing everything. Then the caller will know where it failed and can act upon it (maybe ask the user for different login credentials)

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+1 this is a good idea if you have to throw an exception and I've done a lot of this in the past when it comes to file io exceptions. –  JonH Jan 19 '12 at 19:10
    
This is actually what I was doing. I might go down the road of having the callee handle NO exceptions, and have the caller try/catch them, and get extra information from the log if needed. –  MStodd Jan 19 '12 at 19:18
    
@MStodd: It might make sense to break up callee if it is important for the caller to know at which step the problem occurred. –  ChrisWue Jan 19 '12 at 19:42
    
@ChrisWue Not in this case. Also, if the callee is operating on objects in a list and one of those objects throws an exception, that can't be broken up if the callee wants to know what object threw the exception. –  MStodd Jan 19 '12 at 19:50

The Exception class provides a dictionary for adding additional data to an exception, which is accessible via the Exception.Data property.

If all you want to do is relaying extra bits of information to the caller, then there is no reason to wrap the original exception and throw a new one. Instead you can just do:

//try to log in and get SomeException  
catch(SomeException ex)
{
  ex.Data.Add("action", "Login");
  throw;
}

...

//try to send a file and get SomeException
catch(SomeException ex)
{
    ex.Data.Add("action", "Sending of file");
    throw;
}

...

// somewhere further up the call stack
catch(SomeException ex)
{
    var action = ex.Data["action"] ?? "Unknown action";
    Console.WriteLine("{0} failed.", action); // ... or whatever.
}

That way you will be able to preserve the original stacktrace while you still can present extra information to the user.

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Why does the caller method care what callee was doing? Will it take a different action if the problem occurred while sending the file?

try
{
    callee(..);
}
catch (SomeException e)
{
   if (e.Message == "Sending file failed")
   {
      // what would you do here?
   }
}

As a general rule, Exceptions should be exceptional. Your typical logic flow should not require them to be thrown and caught. When they are thrown, it is usually supposed to be because of a bug in your code*. So the main purpose of an exception is:

  1. to stop the flow of logic before the bug causes any more damage, and
  2. to provide information about the state of the system when the bug occurred, so you can pinpoint the source of the bug.

With this in mind, you should generally only catch exceptions if:

  1. you are planning to wrap the exception with additional data (as in your example) and throw a new exception, or
  2. you know that there will be no further ill effects from continuing with your logic flow: you recognize that the thing you tried to do failed, and regardless of how it failed, you are at peace with that. In these cases, you should always take the opportunity to log the error.

If there is a fairly common case for failure (e.g., user provided bad login credentials), this should not be handled as an exception. Rather, you should structure your callee method signature so that its returned result provides all the details the caller needs to know about what went wrong.

*The notable exception is when something truly unforeseeable happens, like if someone unplugged the network cable from the computer in the middle of the transaction.

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If you genuinely have a scenario where a caller needs to handle the exceptions differently, then the typical strategy is to "catch and wrap" the underlying exception in the callee.

You can either

  • wrap all caught underlying exceptions in a single custom exception type, with a status code indicating which underlying exception was thrown. This is common when using the provider-model design pattern. For example Membership.CreateUser can throw a MembershipCreateUserException which has a status code to distinguish common reasons for the failure. Providers implementers are expected to follow this pattern so that a consumer's exception handling is independent of the provider implementation.

  • or wrap each underlying exception type in a separate custom exception. This might be appropriate if you expect some callers might want to handle one of the exceptions (e.g. send file failed) but not others (e.g. log in failed). By using different exception types, the caller only needs to catch the ones that are of interest.

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'callee' performs a few different things, each of which might throw the same type of exception.

I think this is the real culprit: callee should be throwing either a different type of exception based on kind of failure has happened, or the exceptions of the same type should carry enough additional information to let the caller figure out how to handle this particular exception. Of course if the caller is not intended to handle the exception at all, it shouldn't be in the business of catching it in the first place.

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There is no single best practice to cover all scenarios in .Net. Anyone who says "always use exceptions" or "always use error codes" is simply wrong. Programs written in .Net are to broad and complex to generalize into a hard and fast rule like that.

There are many cases where exceptions simply aren't appropriate. For example if I have a very tight loop looking up values in a Dictionary<TKey, TValue> i would absolutely prefer TryGetValue over a throwing indexer. Yet in other cases I would prefer the throw if the data provided to me was contracted to already be in the map.

The best way to approach this decision is on a case by case basis. In general I only use Exceptions if the situation is truly exceptional. One essentially that couldn't be predicted by the caller or results from the caller explicitly violating a contract. Examples

  • Can't be predicted: File not found
  • Contract Violation: Passing a negative index into an indexer
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The caller doesn't need to know what the callee was doing at the time of the exception. It shouldn't know anything about how the callee is implemented.

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5  
As with all blanket statements, this one is also misleading (oh the irony). If that were true, there wouldn't be a bazillion different exception types in .NET. –  Jon Jan 19 '12 at 19:05
    
There aren't actually a bazillion exception types. Additionally, those types don't indicate "what the callee was doing"; they indicate the result of the callee doing it, which is quite different. –  John Saunders Jan 19 '12 at 19:08
    
I dare you to click here (and consider that those are only the immediate children of System.Exception -- the fun continues e.g. here). As for the action vs result distinction IMHO it's a red herring; noone throws exceptions unless there is a result to report (an undesirable one). –  Jon Jan 19 '12 at 19:13
    
That doesn't help me solve my problem, but it is a valid statement, and something I wasn't taking into consideration. Useful. –  MStodd Jan 19 '12 at 19:22
1  
Actually, no, I believe the caller should only care about its own state. It should neither know, nor care about the state of methods it calls. Otherwise, methods become too closely coupled. What do you think should be conveyed? I find it rare that a caller needs to differentiate among the exceptions thrown by a method it calls. –  John Saunders Jan 19 '12 at 20:25

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