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Currently, I loop the Canvas.Pixels[] property and read each pixel on a canvas to swap Red/Blue bytes around (for specific reasons). However, it takes an average of 2 seconds per picture, and I have over 8,000 pictures I need to convert (overnight). I understand I can use a method of ScanLine to accomplish this much faster, but I know nothing about ScanLine - it's a much lower level of coding than I'm comfortable with. What's the fastest way to accomplish this? I'm willing to wait some time for this to run through, but it would still be nice if I could chop that time in half or more.

Right now, this is the procedure I use:

procedure SwapBytes(var Bmp: TBitmap);
var
  X, Y: Integer;
  R, G, B: Byte;
  C: TColor;
begin
  for Y := 0 to Bmp.Height - 1 do begin
    for X := 0 to Bmp.Width - 1 do begin
      C:= Bmp.Canvas.Pixels[X,Y];
      R:= GetRValue(C);
      G:= GetGValue(C);
      B:= GetBValue(C);
      Bmp.Canvas.Pixels[X,Y]:= RGB(B, G, R)
    end;
  end;
end;

Added Note: An initial conversion of over 8,000 images is the first step of why I need this. However, I also will be using the same thing in our software to automatically convert any image on the spot, as needed. So a third-party converter won't work, because I cannot distribute this to our clients.

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3  
There's a sample in the docwiki that shows using ScanLine and accessing RGB triples. –  Ken White Jan 19 '12 at 19:28
    
Oh, you made out that you were writing a utility to convert your images. "I have over 8,000 pictures I need to convert (overnight)". Never mind. –  David Heffernan Jan 19 '12 at 19:32
    
@KenWhite Thanks, looking into it... –  Jerry Dodge Jan 19 '12 at 19:33
1  
Here is also a good reading about scanlines. –  TLama Jan 19 '12 at 20:14
1  
@Jerry Dodge, you might not even need this if you hack the jpeg.pas source... (see your other question) –  François Jan 19 '12 at 20:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I would try something like follows. This version is only for 24-bit bitmaps:

procedure SwapRedBluePixels(ABitmap: TBitmap);
var
  X: Integer;
  Y: Integer;
  Red: Byte;
  Pixel: PRGBTriple;
begin
  // check for the bit depth, it must be 24-bit if you use PRGBTriple pointer
  // for line scan; if it wouldn't the iterated line pointers would point to 
  // another place in the memory
  if ABitmap.PixelFormat <> pf24bit then
  begin
    ShowMessage('Your bitmap has color depth different from 24-bit');
    Exit;
  end;
  // iterate through the image vertically
  for Y := 0 to (ABitmap.Height - 1) do
  begin
    // access the line of pixels and get the pointer to the first pixel of 
    // that line
    Pixel := ABitmap.ScanLine[Y];
    // iterate through the scanned line pixels horizontally
    for X := 0 to (ABitmap.Width - 1) do
    begin
      // store the pixel's red channel value
      Red := Pixel.rgbtRed;
      // modify the pixel's red channel value
      Pixel.rgbtRed := Pixel.rgbtBlue;
      // modify the pixel's blue channel value
      Pixel.rgbtBlue := Red;
      // increment to get the next pixel pointer of the scanned line
      Inc(Pixel);
    end;
  end;
end;

Update 2:

This version is for 24-bit and 32-bit bitmaps:

procedure SwapRedBluePixels(ABitmap: TBitmap);
var
  X: Integer;
  Y: Integer;
  Red: Byte;
  Size: Integer;
  Pixels: PByteArray;
begin
  // check the color depth and set the size of the pixel arrangement
  case ABitmap.PixelFormat of
    pf24bit: Size := SizeOf(TRGBTriple);
    pf32bit: Size := SizeOf(TRGBQuad);
  else
    // if the image is not 24-bit or 32-bit go away
    begin
      ShowMessage('Your bitmap has unsupported color depth!');
      Exit;
    end;
  end;

  // iterate through the image vertically
  for Y := 0 to (ABitmap.Height - 1) do
  begin
    // access the line of pixels and get the pointer to the first pixel of
    // that line
    Pixels := ABitmap.ScanLine[Y];
    // iterate through the scanned line pixels horizontally
    // for 24-bit images the pixels are stored like
    // B -> G -> R -> B -> G -> R etc.
    // for 32-bit images the pixels are stored like
    // B -> G -> R -> A -> B -> G -> R -> A etc.
    // so we can simply use e.g. byte array and iterate through
    // it, if we have 24-bit image, we have to read each element,
    // if 32-bit we have to skip the alpha (reserved) channel
    for X := 0 to (ABitmap.Width - 1) do
    begin
      // store the pixel's red channel value
      Red := Pixels^[(X * Size) + 2];
      // modify the pixel's red channel value
      Pixels^[(X * Size) + 2] := Pixels^[(X * Size)];
      // modify the pixel's blue channel value
      Pixels^[(X * Size)] := Red;
    end;
  end;
end;
share|improve this answer
1  
@Jerry There aren't separate lines for red and blue. It's a line of pixels. That's just how bitmaps are. –  David Heffernan Jan 19 '12 at 19:37
1  
@AndriyM Actually no, that's the beauty of ScanLine is it works directly with the image it came from. –  Jerry Dodge Jan 19 '12 at 19:41
3  
@AndriyM, they're never taken out. :) ScanLine is a pointer to the actual bitmap memory for a row of pixels. –  Ken White Jan 19 '12 at 19:42
5  
You have to test for the Pixel Format. Seems you assume pf32bit here... –  François Jan 19 '12 at 20:36
1  
@François, very good point, thanks. The bitmaps containing alpha are less usual. The most common are 24-bit. I'll modify my answer a little bit (I just copied it from my old post). –  TLama Jan 19 '12 at 20:43

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