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I'm working on creating a fireworks show in javascript for my last day of work tomorrow and I'm having some trouble getting it to automate. I'm using the fireworks found here and it works great, but this is going to be on a status webpage that I developed a while ago so I want the fireworks to be automatic instead of on click.

I've created a function on the fireworks.js page that looks like this...

function fireFireworks(){
    var num = Math.floor(Math.random()*3) + 1;
    for(i=0;i<num;i++){
        createFirework();
    }
}

This will be used to fire between 1 and 3 fireworks when it's called. Then I setup

setInterval('fireFireworks()', 5000);

When both of these are defined in my local file and not in the fireworks.js file I get a bad reference to createFirework().

So I moved the fireFireworks() to just under the initialize function in fireworks.js and then I would get a bad reference to fireFireworks() so I moved my setInterval into the intialize function, but I still get a bad reference to fireFireworks().

However, if I change the binder for onmouseup from document.addEventListener('mouseup', createFireworks, true); to document.addEventListener('mouseup', fireFireworks, true);

It successfully creates my multiple fireworks.

I'm assuming that the scope of setInterval is playing a part here. If anyone could give me an idea of how I could automate this as well as some info as to why my setup isn't working I'd really appreciate it!

share|improve this question
1  
Did you try just setInterval(fireFireworks, 5000)? –  pimvdb Jan 19 '12 at 19:44
1  
Please don't use strings in setInterval(), use anonymous functions or just the function name itself: setInterval(fireFireworks, 5000); –  ComFreek Jan 19 '12 at 19:45
    
@pimvdb, I did once that method was in the fireworks.js file. Still no luck. –  Shaded Jan 19 '12 at 19:45
    
@pimvdb Let me rephrase my last comment, I did not try it as not a string. Now that I have, it works beautifully. Any information as to why the string doesn't work, but it does for non anonymous functions? –  Shaded Jan 19 '12 at 19:47
    
Please provide more code. I would like to see how and where you are calling your functions. –  Paul Jan 19 '12 at 19:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's nicer to pass the function itself to setInterval, i.e.

setInterval (fireFireworks, 5000)

As for the scoping, if your createFireworks function isn't used anywhere else, just put it inside fireFireworks and you don't have to worry about it any more (it's generally considered nicer to do that anyway, because it avoids polluting the global scope).

Otherwise, wrap both functions in a closure:

(function ()
{
    function fireFireworks ()
    {
        /* ... */
    }

    function createFirework ()
    {
        /* ... */
    }

    setInterval (fireFireworks, 5000)

}) ();
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting that passing the function as a string works in a general case but not when closures are involved. –  Shaded Jan 19 '12 at 19:56
    
That's because the string is evaluated later, in global scope. The name of your function only means anything inside the closure. –  James McLaughlin Jan 19 '12 at 20:03

Try this:

(function(global){
    var theShow = {},
        createFirework;

    createFirework = function() {
    };    

    theShow.fireFireworks = function() {
        var num = Math.floor(Math.random()*3) + 1,
            i = 0;
        for(i;i<num;i++){
            createFirework();
        }
    };
   global.setInterval(theShow.fireFireworks , 5000);
   global.theShow = theShow;
}(window));

You will now be able to call theShow.firFireworks() from any JavaScript code in your application as long at it is after this code is called. Hope this helps.

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You are using the setInterval() function in way that is messing up your scope, (using a string). Try adding to your initialize function:

 var fireworksTimer = setInterval(fireFireworks, 5000); 

then if you make fireFireworks a "public" function,

 fireFireworks = function(){
      ....
 }

in the separate js file, it should now be callable.

share|improve this answer
    
saveFormState?? –  cambraca Jan 19 '12 at 19:45
    
accidental submission. Holy fast down vote, sorry, hit tab then space, which = submit in SO. –  Jlange Jan 19 '12 at 19:48
    
Well, actually the downvote is for something else: it's not wrong to put a string in setInterval, it's just very ugly. –  cambraca Jan 19 '12 at 19:52
    
fixed the wording. –  Jlange Jan 19 '12 at 19:55

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