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I have a DomainClass with two variables and the user can only set one or the other. The one they don't set is determined by some code in the setter of the one they set. So if they set A, B gets set what I want, and if they set B, A gets set what I want. The problem I'm having is that on .save() GORM or Hibernate or something is hitting the setters as well.

Here is my example domain added to a fresh grails 2.0 project called l2getset:

package l2getset

class ExampleDomain {
  String thisIsA
  String thisIsB
  void setThisIsA(String thisIsA){
    println "Hitting A Setter"
    this.thisIsA = thisIsA
    this.thisIsB = 'user set A'
  }
  void setThisIsB(String thisIsB){
    println "Hitting B Setter"
    this.thisIsB = thisIsB
    this.thisIsA = 'user set B'
  }
  static constraints = {
  }
}

And the bootstrap:

import l2getset.*
class BootStrap {
  def init = { servletContext ->
    def someExample = new ExampleDomain()
    someExample.thisIsA = "Some String"

    println "Some Example is: ${someExample.thisIsA} / ${someExample.thisIsB}"
    someExample.save()
    println "Some Example is: ${someExample.thisIsA} / ${someExample.thisIsB}"  
  }
  def destroy = {
  }
}

Prints:

| Running Grails application
Hitting A Setter
Some Example is: Some String / user set A
Hitting A Setter
Hitting B Setter
Some Example is: user set B / user set A
| Server running. Browse to http://localhost:8080/l2getset

How do I differentiate between when I "legitimately" set one of these and when GORM/Hibernate/PleaseExplain is just "playing around with my setters" before it persists my stuff?

This question: Why are setters in Grails called twice on save? appears to also touch on the issue, but I'm still left wondering what is going on and how to tackle my problem.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's happening because hibernate automatically uses setters when setting properties when you load. What you want is field-level access to these properties in hibernate.

See this for how to implement it.

Grails: field access with GORM

share|improve this answer
    
That seems like a LOT for the functionality I'm looking for. Is there some kind of groovy hack to check how its getting called and figure out if its from a hibernate.save() or not? – Mikey Jan 19 '12 at 22:27
    
This wasn't actually that hard. See my comment on the other question. – Mikey Feb 7 '12 at 19:02

Another way to do this is to have the value be persisted in one value, but you use a transient property as the value that your code interacts with. The setter for the transient property has your extra code in it, and it also sets the "real" value that hibernate is aware of.

Ex:

package l2getset

class ExampleDomain {
  String _thisIsA
  String _thisIsB

  static transients = ["thisIsA", "thisIsB"]

  String getThisIsA() { _thisIsA }

  void setThisIsA(String thisIsA){
    println "Hitting A Setter"
    this._thisIsA = thisIsA
    this._thisIsB = 'user set A'
  }

  String getThisIsB() { _thisIsB }

  void setThisIsB(String thisIsB){
    println "Hitting B Setter"
    this._thisIsB = thisIsB
    this._thisIsA = 'user set B'
  }
}

prints:

Running Grails application..
Hitting A Setter
Some Example is: Some String / user set A
Some Example is: Some String / user set A
Server running. Browse to http://localhost:8080/transient-setter

If you need to, you can mess with the mapping of the domain class to tell it that the _thisIsA and _thisIsB fields map to a file name without the _.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a good idea, but it breaks down for my actual problem. Thanks for the suggestion - I'll probably be using this down that road. – Mikey Feb 7 '12 at 19:05

Here is my hack solution:

Replace the line this.thisIsB = 'user set A' in void setThisIsA with the following check of the stack trace:

StringWriter sw = new StringWriter();
new Throwable("").printStackTrace(new PrintWriter(sw));
String stackTrace = sw.toString();
if(!stackTrace.find('DefaultSaveOrUpdateEventListener')){
  this.b = 'user set A'
}

And do vice versa for void setThisIsB

share|improve this answer
    
Adds about 12ms of overhead, so I'm going to do it the correct way. – Mikey Jan 20 '12 at 2:20

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