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I've written the following function based on subset(), which I find handy:

ss <- function (x, subset, ...) 
{
    r <- eval(substitute(subset), data.frame(.=x), parent.frame())
    if (!is.logical(r)) 
        stop("'subset' must be logical")
    x[r & !is.na(r)]
}

So, I can write:

ss(myDataFrame$MyVariableName, 500 < . & . < 1500)

instead of

myDataFrame$MyVariableName[ 500 < myDataFrame$MyVariableName 
                                & myDataFrame$MyVariableName < 1500]

This seems like something other people might have developed solutions for, though - including something in core R I might have missed. Anything already out there?

share|improve this question
    
It still seems to work if we change data.frame(.=x) to list(.=x) and I suspect performance will improve. –  BondedDust Jan 19 '12 at 22:22
    
Good point @DWin . –  Ken Williams Jan 19 '12 at 22:29
    
To clarify - I just used myDataFrame$MyVariableName as an example of a very long vector name. I probably should have used myVeryVeryVeryLongVariableName or something, but if I edit it now, @joran's answer won't make much sense. =) –  Ken Williams Jan 19 '12 at 22:31

2 Answers 2

I realize that the solution Ken offers is more general than just selecting items within ranges (since it should work on any logical expression) but this did remind me that Greg Snow has comparison infix operators in his Teaching Demos package:

library(TeachingDemos)
x0 <- rnorm(100)
x0[ 0 %<% x0 %<% 1.5 ]
share|improve this answer
    
Cool! I've always wanted an x < y < z construct too. –  Ken Williams Jan 20 '12 at 3:44
    
I remember when Perl got such a thing - they realized that they already had a fatal error saying "You've used 'x < y < z', which you must rewrite as 'x < y && y < z'", and realized how silly it was to not just DWIM. –  Ken Williams Jan 20 '12 at 3:46
    
Note that a < x < b is equivalent to abs(x-mean(c(a,b))) < (b-mean(c(a,b))) –  James Jan 20 '12 at 8:57
    
@James handy when you only want to evaluate x once. –  Ken Williams Jan 20 '12 at 16:49

Thanks for sharing Ken.

You could use:

x <- myDataFrame$MyVariableName; x[x > 100 & x < 180] 

Yours may require less typing but the code is less generalizable to others if you're sharing code. I have a few time saver functions like that myself but use them sparingly because they may be slowing down your code (extra steps) and requires you to also include that code for that function when ever you share the file with someone else.

Compare writing length. Almost the same length:

ss(mtcars$hp, 100 < . & . < 180)
x <- mtcars$hp; x[x > 100 & x < 180] 

Compare time on 1000 replications.

library(rbenchmark)
benchmark(
       tyler = x[x > 100 & x < 180],
       ken = ss(mtcars$hp, 100 <. & . < 180),
 replications=1000)

   test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
2   ken         1000    0.56 18.66667      0.36     0.03         NA        NA
1 tyler         1000    0.03  1.00000      0.03     0.00         NA        NA

So I guess it depends on if you need speed and/or sharability vs convenience. If it's just for you on a small data set I'd say it's valuable.

EDIT: NEW BENCHMARKING

> benchmark(
+     tyler = {x <- mtcars$hp; x[x > 100 & x < 180]}, 
+     ken = ss(mtcars$hp, 100 <. & . < 180), 
+     ken2 = ss2(mtcars$hp, 100 <. & . < 180),
+     joran = with(mtcars,hp[hp>100 & hp< 180 ]), 
+  replications=10000)

   test replications elapsed  relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
4 joran        10000    0.83  2.677419      0.69     0.00         NA        NA
2   ken        10000    3.79 12.225806      3.45     0.02         NA        NA
3  ken2        10000    0.67  2.161290      0.35     0.00         NA        NA
1 tyler        10000    0.31  1.000000      0.20     0.00         NA        NA
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I thought about that too - it's essentially what I'm doing inside my ss() function, of course, but my x is named .. –  Ken Williams Jan 19 '12 at 22:35
    
As for speed, I took @DWin's suggestion and saw about a 10x improvement on this benchmark. benchmark( tyler = {x <- mtcars$hp; x[x > 100 & x < 180]}, ken = ss(mtcars$hp, 100 <. & . < 180), ken2 = ss2(mtcars$hp, 100 <. & . < 180),+ replications=10000) test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child 2 ken 10000 2.26 15.06667 2.25 0 NA NA 3 ken2 10000 0.24 1.60000 0.25 0 NA NA 1 tyler 10000 0.15 1.00000 0.15 0 NA NA –  Ken Williams Jan 19 '12 at 22:36
    
gah, that's not pretty at all! –  Ken Williams Jan 19 '12 at 22:36
    
The other thing I changed in that benchmark was to include the assignment to x in the tyler code. –  Ken Williams Jan 19 '12 at 22:37
    
Ken just add the code to your original post or as an answer at the bottom –  Tyler Rinker Jan 19 '12 at 22:38

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