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When we define an operator function inside a class an we also define it inside a class then that function is NOT part of the class.

but also the same task is achived when that function is outside the class and we declare it as a friend inside a class but not define it.

consider this code which have two identical operator definitions where one is inside the class an another ouside the class:

version 1 (inside of a class)

class MyClass
{
    // version 1 inside a class
    friend MyClass&& operator +(MyClass& a, MyClass& b)
    {
        return move(MyClass(a.x + b.x, a.y + b.y));
    }
    int x,y;

public:
    MyClass() {}
    MyClass(int,int){}
};

int main()
{
    MyClass a, b, c;
    c = a + b;
    cin.ignore();
    return 0;
}

version 2 (outside of a class)

class MyClass
{
      friend MyClass&& operator +(MyClass& a, MyClass& b);
    int x,y;

public:
    MyClass() {}
    MyClass(int,int){}
};

MyClass&& operator +(MyClass& a, MyClass& b)
{
    return move(MyClass(a.x + b.x, a.y + b.y));
}

int main()
{
    MyClass a, b, c;
    c = a + b;
    cin.ignore();
    return 0;
}

what's the difference in those two approaches?

share|improve this question
    
All that moving and returning by rvalue reference is meaningless. – Benjamin Lindley Jan 19 '12 at 21:45
    
isn't return by RValue faster then return by value? – codekiddy Jan 19 '12 at 21:52
    
Not meaningless, but wrong. Returning a local or temporary by reference is undefined behavior. – Ben Voigt Jan 19 '12 at 22:11
    
@codekiddy: No, in fact, it's just plain wrong. You're returning a reference to a local variable. And you're applying the move to a temporary. It already is an rvalue, so there's no need to use move on it. – Benjamin Lindley Jan 19 '12 at 22:12
    
@codekiddy, In general, you should avoid explicitly doing anything yourself involving && or move or forward or anything like that. The compiler will do the right thing automatically when it knows it's safe to do so. If you do it yourself, you're more likely to introduce bugs than to speed anything up. In fact, all this rvalueref stuff was introduced precisely so that people could write simple code which appears naive on the surface and which passes things by value. – Aaron McDaid Jan 19 '12 at 22:27
up vote 1 down vote accepted

At the moment, you are defining MyClass&& operator +(MyClass& a, MyClass& b) twice in the first snippet and once in the second. If you remove the second definition, the two will be semantically equivalent.

The two will do the same thing. In some cases one may be preferred over the other (for example, the second can be placed in a cpp file and the first may be more natural with templates).

Note that the first is implicitly marked inline, the second is not.

(You should be passing MyClass by const reference, though.)

share|improve this answer
    
oh thanks I've corrected my first snippet. so those two snippets now when corrected are completly the same? – codekiddy Jan 19 '12 at 21:50
    
@codekiddy: Updated to reflect changes. – Anton Golov Jan 19 '12 at 21:55
    
Oh yeah, templates and inlining make sence. thanks! – codekiddy Jan 19 '12 at 21:57
    
Note that friend functions inside the class body can only be found with argument dependent lookup (ADL), but cannot be explicitly qualified. – TemplateRex Aug 7 '12 at 10:23

In your case, both versions do the same thing (return a dangling reference, actually, causing undefined behavior), although one is inline and two isn't.

In general, the friend function whose body is defined inside the class also may use class members without qualification (those would be static members, possibly in base classes, since there's no this pointer in a friend function).

Here's the relevant text in the standard (section 11.3 [class.friend]):

A function can be defined in a friend declaration of a class if and only if the class is a non-local class (9.8), the function name is unqualified, and the function has namespace scope.

Such a function is implicitly inline. A friend function defined in a class is in the (lexical) scope of the class in which it is defined. A friend function defined outside the class is not (3.4.1).

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