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X is true nearly 99.9% of the time but I need to handle Y and Z as well. Although the body of the X condition is empty, I'm thinking it should be faster than potentially checking 2 other conditions Y and Z if the X condition is omitted. What do you think?

if (likely(X))
{
}
else if (unlikely(Y))
{
...
}
else if (unlikely(Z))
{
...
}
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8  
What makes you think you need to worry about this ? –  Paul R Jan 19 '12 at 21:47
    
The answer depends on your logic. Does condition X always imply not-Y and not-Z? –  Greg Hewgill Jan 19 '12 at 21:48
    
@PaulR because it's in a very very tight loop. –  chriskirk Jan 19 '12 at 21:57
8  
And you've profiled it ? –  Paul R Jan 19 '12 at 22:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You might want to know what exactly happens when you use likely or unlikely:
http://kerneltrap.org/node/4705

I would personally write

if (unlikely(!X))
{
  if (unlikely(Y))
  {
  ...
  }
  else if (unlikely(Z))
  {
   ...
  }
}

Which means if x, continue execution, else jump to if body.

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As usual, when in doubt profile; anyhow, if I were to read that code I would find much clearer something like:

if (!likely(X))
{
    if (unlikely(Y))
    {
    ...
    }
    else if (unlikely(Z))
    {
    ...
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I am not really sure that the negation of unlikely will work as expected ?? I would rather write unlikely(!x). This means that there will be no jump if x is false. –  log0 Jan 19 '12 at 21:58
    
@Ugo I like the solution posted by Matteo and I rewrote it using your unlikely(!x) instead. –  chriskirk Jan 19 '12 at 22:01
    
@Ugo: I assumed that likely(X) was the whole condition to be evaluated, as in his pseudocode... still, the point I'm making should be clear. –  Matteo Italia Jan 19 '12 at 22:15
2  
@MatteoItalia: likely and unlikely are macros provided by GCC that wraps compiler specific builtins that hint to the compiler whether a condition is likely or not. (gcc's is __builtin_expect I think) –  Matthieu M. Jan 20 '12 at 7:25
    
@MatthieuM.: uh, good to know, I didn't know about them. –  Matteo Italia Jan 20 '12 at 21:22

If a compiler is to assume, it would generally favor the first condition true.

you can use something like __builtin_expect to control this (as Ugo detailed).

If it's in a loop, you should measure because hardware is also a consideration -- it's not just the source and the compiler. How's your cache, and how's branch prediction working for you? Profile. Alter. Profile. Compare.

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Do you really need the unlikely's on y and z? It sounds from your question like if x is not true, then y or z must be true, in which case those unlikely's are incorrect and I would go with this:

if (unlikely(!X))
{
  if (Y)
  {
  ...
  }
  else //Z must be true
  {
   ...
  }
}

(Would have made this a comment on Ugo's answer, but I don't have enough reputation to leave comments.)

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