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I want to build a comma delimited string from Range A1:A400.

What is the best way of doing this? Should I use a For loop?

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You can use the StringConcat Function created by Chip Pearson. Please see the below link :) Topic: String Concatenation Link: http://www.cpearson.com/Excel/StringConcatenation.aspx –  Siddharth Rout Jan 19 '12 at 22:21
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3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The laziest way is

s = join(Application.WorksheetFunction.Transpose([a1:a400]), ",")

This works because .Value property of a multicell range returns a 2D array, and Join expects 1D array, and Transpose is trying to be too helpful, so when it detects a 2D array with just one column, it converts it to a 1D array.

In production it is advised to use at least a little bit less lazy option,

s = join(Application.WorksheetFunction.Transpose(Worksheets(someIndex).Range("A1:A400").Value), ",")

otherwise the active sheet will always be used.

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4  
That's a beautifully concise explanation of three rather confusing behaviors that I've always sort of half-understood. I'm now up to about three-quarters. –  Doug Glancy Jan 19 '12 at 23:03
    
+1, cleared up something for me too. –  justnS Jan 19 '12 at 23:21
    
@GSerg How would I build the same string for Range A1 to Z1? –  user793468 Jan 19 '12 at 23:40
    
@user793468 Well, if you're happy to remain lazy, then just throw in another transpose: join(Application.Worksheetfunction.Transpose(Application.WorksheetFunction.Tran‌​spose([a1:z1])), ",") –  GSerg Jan 20 '12 at 0:00
1  
See answer below: I regard this answer from @GSerg as the definitive reply - and a useful explanation of some oddities in Transpose - but, for completeness, I have posted a code sample that bypasses the 255-char limitations on reading data from a cell. –  Nile Aug 21 '12 at 12:26
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I would regard @GSerg's answer as the definitive reply to your question.

For completeness - and to address a few limitations in other answers - I would suggest that you use a 'Join' function that supports 2-Dimensional arrays:

s = Join2d(Worksheets(someIndex).Range("A1:A400").Value)

The point here is that the Value property of a range (providing it isn't a single cell) is always a 2-Dimensional array.

Note that the row delimiter in the Join2d function below is only present when there are Rows (plural) to delimit: you won't see it in the concatenated string from a single-row range.

Join2d: A 2-Dimensional Join function in VBA with optimised string-handling

Coding notes:

  1. This Join function does not suffer from the 255-char limitation that affects most (if not all) of the native Concatenate functions in Excel, and the Range.Value code sample above will pass in the data, in full, from cells containing longer strings.
  2. This is heavily optimised: we use string-concatenation as little as possible, as the native VBA string-concatenations are slow and get progressively slower as a longer string is concatenated.
    Public Function Join2d(ByRef InputArray As Variant, _ 
                           Optional RowDelimiter As String = vbCr, _ 
                           Optional FieldDelimiter = vbTab,_ 
                           Optional SkipBlankRows As Boolean = False) As String

' Join up a 2-dimensional array into a string. Works like VBA.Strings.Join, for a 2-dimensional array.
' Note that the default delimiters are those inserted into the string returned by ADODB.Recordset.GetString
On Error Resume Next

' Coding note: we're not doing any string-handling in VBA.Strings - allocating, deallocating and (especially!) concatenating are SLOW.
' We're using the VBA Join & Split functions ONLY. The VBA Join, Split, & Replace functions are linked directly to fast (by VBA standards)
' functions in the native Windows code. Feel free to optimise further by declaring and using the Kernel string functions if you want to.

' **** THIS CODE IS IN THE PUBLIC DOMAIN ****   Nigel Heffernan   Excellerando.Blogspot.com

Dim i As Long
Dim j As Long
Dim i_lBound As Long
Dim i_uBound As Long
Dim j_lBound As Long
Dim j_uBound As Long
Dim arrTemp1() As String
Dim arrTemp2() As String
Dim strBlankRow As String

i_lBound = LBound(InputArray, 1)
i_uBound = UBound(InputArray, 1)
j_lBound = LBound(InputArray, 2)
j_uBound = UBound(InputArray, 2)

ReDim arrTemp1(i_lBound To i_uBound)
ReDim arrTemp2(j_lBound To j_uBound)

For i = i_lBound To i_uBound

    For j = j_lBound To j_uBound
        arrTemp2(j) = InputArray(i, j)
    Next j
    arrTemp1(i) = Join(arrTemp2, FieldDelimiter)
Next i

If SkipBlankRows Then
    If Len(FieldDelimiter) = 1 Then
        strBlankRow = String(j_uBound - j_lBound, FieldDelimiter)
    Else
        For j = j_lBound To j_uBound
            strBlankRow = strBlankRow & FieldDelimiter
        Next j
    End If

    Join2d = Replace(Join(arrTemp1, RowDelimiter), strBlankRow & RowDelimiter, "")
    i = Len(strBlankRow & RowDelimiter)

    If Left(Join2d, i) = strBlankRow & RowDelimiter Then
        Mid$(Join2d, 1, i) = ""
    End If 
Else
    Join2d = Join(arrTemp1, RowDelimiter)
End If
Erase arrTemp1
End Function

For completeness, here's the corresponding 2-D Split function:

Split2d: A 2-Dimensional Split function in VBA with optimised string-handling

Public Function Split2d(ByRef strInput As String, _ 
                        Optional RowDelimiter As String = vbCr, _ 
                        Optional FieldDelimiter = vbTab, _ 
                        Optional CoerceLowerBound As Long = 0) As Variant

' Split up a string into a 2-dimensional array. Works like VBA.Strings.Split, for a 2-dimensional array.
' Check your lower bounds on return: never assume that any array in VBA is zero-based, even if you've set Option Base 0
' If in doubt, coerce the lower bounds to 0 or 1 by setting CoerceLowerBound
' Note that the default delimiters are those inserted into the string returned by ADODB.Recordset.GetString
On Error Resume Next

' Coding note: we're not doing any string-handling in VBA.Strings - allocating, deallocating and (especially!) concatenating are SLOW.
' We're using the VBA Join & Split functions ONLY. The VBA Join, Split, & Replace functions are linked directly to fast (by VBA standards)
' functions in the native Windows code. Feel free to optimise further by declaring and using the Kernel string functions if you want to.


' **** THIS CODE IS IN THE PUBLIC DOMAIN ****   Nigel Heffernan  Excellerando.Blogspot.com

Dim i   As Long
Dim j   As Long
Dim i_n As Long
Dim j_n As Long
Dim i_lBound As Long
Dim i_uBound As Long
Dim j_lBound As Long
Dim j_uBound As Long
Dim arrTemp1 As Variant
Dim arrTemp2 As Variant

arrTemp1 = Split(strInput, RowDelimiter)

i_lBound = LBound(arrTemp1)
i_uBound = UBound(arrTemp1)

If VBA.LenB(arrTemp1(i_uBound)) <= 0 Then  ' clip out empty last row: common artifact data loaded from files with a terminating row delimiter
    i_uBound = i_uBound - 1
End If

i = i_lBound
arrTemp2 = Split(arrTemp1(i), FieldDelimiter)

j_lBound = LBound(arrTemp2)
j_uBound = UBound(arrTemp2)

If VBA.LenB(arrTemp2(j_uBound)) <= 0 Then  ' ! potential error: first row with an empty last field...
    j_uBound = j_uBound - 1
End If

i_n = CoerceLowerBound - i_lBound
j_n = CoerceLowerBound - j_lBound

ReDim arrData(i_lBound + i_n To i_uBound + i_n, j_lBound + j_n To j_uBound + j_n)

' As we've got the first row already... populate it here, and start the main loop from lbound+1

For j = j_lBound To j_uBound
    arrData(i_lBound + i_n, j + j_n) = arrTemp2(j)
Next j

For i = i_lBound + 1 To i_uBound Step 1
    arrTemp2 = Split(arrTemp1(i), FieldDelimiter)   
    For j = j_lBound To j_uBound Step 1    
        arrData(i + i_n, j + j_n) = arrTemp2(j)    
    Next j    
    Erase arrTemp2
Next i

Erase arrTemp1

Application.StatusBar = False

Split2d = arrData
End Function

Share and enjoy... And watch out for unwanted line breaks in the code, inserted by your browser (or by StackOverflow's helpful formatting functions)

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1  
+1 Great post! Even sneaks in a Mid$ to the left and a LenB! The only very minor nitpick suggestion is VbNullstring rather than "" .... So I see you are Nigel H who posts at Dicks Blog occasionally. I enjoy your work –  brettdj Nov 4 '12 at 9:46
    
... you added all the code whitespace back in. –  brettdj Nov 10 '12 at 12:04
    
Is it me or is this impossible to copy & paste into vb editor correctly? Ok revision3 works for copy and paste –  Vijay Feb 10 at 5:24
    
So can't use this as a UDF? –  Vijay Feb 10 at 5:30
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You can use the StringConcat Function created by Chip Pearson. Please see the below link :)

Topic: String Concatenation

Link: http://www.cpearson.com/Excel/StringConcatenation.aspx

Quote From the link in case the link ever dies

This page describes a VBA Function that you can use to concatenate string values in an array formula.

The StringConcat Function

In order to overcome these deficiencies of the CONCATENATE function, it is necessary to build our own function written in VBA that will address the problems of CONCATENATE. The rest of this page describes such a function named StringConcat. This function overcomes all of the deficiencies of CONCATENATE. It can be used to concatenate individual string values, the values one or more worksheet ranges, literal arrays, and the results of an array formula operation.

The function declaration of StringConcat is as follows:

Function StringConcat(Sep As String, ParamArray Args()) As String

The Sep parameter is a character or characters that separate the strings being concatenated. This may be 0 or more characters. The Sep parameter is required. If you do not want any separators in the result string, use an empty string for the value of Sep. The Sep value appears between each string being concatenated, but does not appear at either the beginning or end of the result string. The ParamArray Args parameter is a series values to be concatenated. Each element in the ParamArray may be any of the following:

A literal string, such as "A" A range of cells, specified either by address or by a Range Name. When elements of a two dimensional range are concatenated, the order of concatenation is across one row then down to the next row. A literal array. For example, {"A","B","C"} or {"A";"B";"C"}

The function

Function StringConcat(Sep As String, ParamArray Args()) As Variant
''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
' StringConcat
' By Chip Pearson, chip@cpearson.com, www.cpearson.com
'                  www.cpearson.com/Excel/stringconcatenation.aspx
' This function concatenates all the elements in the Args array,
' delimited by the Sep character, into a single string. This function
' can be used in an array formula. There is a VBA imposed limit that
' a string in a passed in array (e.g.,  calling this function from
' an array formula in a worksheet cell) must be less than 256 characters.
' See the comments at STRING TOO LONG HANDLING for details.
''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
Dim S As String
Dim N As Long
Dim M As Long
Dim R As Range
Dim NumDims As Long
Dim LB As Long
Dim IsArrayAlloc As Boolean

'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
' If no parameters were passed in, return
' vbNullString.
'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
If UBound(Args) - LBound(Args) + 1 = 0 Then
    StringConcat = vbNullString
    Exit Function
End If

For N = LBound(Args) To UBound(Args)
    ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
    ' Loop through the Args
    ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
    If IsObject(Args(N)) = True Then
        '''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
        ' OBJECT
        ' If we have an object, ensure it
        ' it a Range. The Range object
        ' is the only type of object we'll
        ' work with. Anything else causes
        ' a #VALUE error.
        ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
        If TypeOf Args(N) Is Excel.Range Then
            '''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
            ' If it is a Range, loop through the
            ' cells and create append the elements
            ' to the string S.
            '''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
            For Each R In Args(N).Cells
                If Len(R.Text) > 0 Then
                    S = S & R.Text & Sep
                End If
            Next R
        Else
            '''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
            ' Unsupported object type. Return
            ' a #VALUE error.
            '''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
            StringConcat = CVErr(xlErrValue)
            Exit Function
        End If

    ElseIf IsArray(Args(N)) = True Then
        '''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
        ' ARRAY
        ' If Args(N) is an array, ensure it
        ' is an allocated array.
        '''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
        IsArrayAlloc = (Not IsError(LBound(Args(N))) And _
            (LBound(Args(N)) <= UBound(Args(N))))
        If IsArrayAlloc = True Then
            ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
            ' The array is allocated. Determine
            ' the number of dimensions of the
            ' array.
            '''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
            NumDims = 1
            On Error Resume Next
            Err.Clear
            NumDims = 1
            Do Until Err.Number <> 0
                LB = LBound(Args(N), NumDims)
                If Err.Number = 0 Then
                    NumDims = NumDims + 1
                Else
                    NumDims = NumDims - 1
                End If
            Loop
            On Error GoTo 0
            Err.Clear
            ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
            ' The array must have either
            ' one or two dimensions. Greater
            ' that two caues a #VALUE error.
            ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
            If NumDims > 2 Then
                StringConcat = CVErr(xlErrValue)
                Exit Function
            End If
            If NumDims = 1 Then
                For M = LBound(Args(N)) To UBound(Args(N))
                    If Args(N)(M) <> vbNullString Then
                        S = S & Args(N)(M) & Sep
                    End If
                Next M

            Else
                ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
                ' STRING TOO LONG HANDLING
                ' Here, the error handler must be set to either
                '   On Error GoTo ContinueLoop
                '   or
                '   On Error GoTo ErrH
                ' If you use ErrH, then any error, including
                ' a string too long error, will cause the function
                ' to return #VALUE and quit. If you use ContinueLoop,
                ' the problematic value is ignored and not included
                ' in the result, and the result is the concatenation
                ' of all non-error values in the input. This code is
                ' used in the case that an input string is longer than
                ' 255 characters.
                ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
                On Error GoTo ContinueLoop
                'On Error GoTo ErrH
                Err.Clear
                For M = LBound(Args(N), 1) To UBound(Args(N), 1)
                    If Args(N)(M, 1) <> vbNullString Then
                        S = S & Args(N)(M, 1) & Sep
                    End If
                Next M
                Err.Clear
                M = LBound(Args(N), 2)
                If Err.Number = 0 Then
                    For M = LBound(Args(N), 2) To UBound(Args(N), 2)
                        If Args(N)(M, 2) <> vbNullString Then
                            S = S & Args(N)(M, 2) & Sep
                        End If
                    Next M
                End If
                On Error GoTo ErrH:
            End If
        Else
            If Args(N) <> vbNullString Then
                S = S & Args(N) & Sep
            End If
        End If
        Else
        On Error Resume Next
        If Args(N) <> vbNullString Then
            S = S & Args(N) & Sep
        End If
        On Error GoTo 0
    End If
ContinueLoop:
Next N

'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
' Remove the trailing Sep
'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
If Len(Sep) > 0 Then
    If Len(S) > 0 Then
        S = Left(S, Len(S) - Len(Sep))
    End If
End If

StringConcat = S
'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
' Success. Get out.
'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
Exit Function
ErrH:
'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
' Error. Return #VALUE
'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
StringConcat = CVErr(xlErrValue)
End Function
share|improve this answer
1  
I am reluctant to criticise any code written by Chip Pearson - he is an acknowledged master of the art of VBA and Excel development - but this isn't how you do string concatenation in VBA. The basic techniques is to avoid allocation and concatenation ( here's why: aivosto.com/vbtips/stringopt2.html#huge ) - I use join, split, and replace for this - and more advanced techniques are listed in parts I, II and II of this web article: aivosto.com/vbtips/stringopt3.html –  Nile Aug 21 '12 at 12:15
1  
Also... That Concatenate function is constrained by the familiar limitations on reading data from cells containing more than 255 chars. Se the code sample below, with a 2-Dimensional 'Join' function. –  Nile Aug 21 '12 at 12:20
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