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Here is the code on which I set my handler for SIGABRT signal then I call abort() but handler does not get trigered, instead program gets aborted, why?

#include <iostream>
#include <csignal>
using namespace std;
void Triger(int x)
{
    cout << "Function triger" << endl;
}

int main()
{
    signal(SIGABRT, Triger);
    abort();
    cin.ignore();
    return 0;
}

PROGRAM OUTPUT:

enter image description here

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Works perfectly here, after I include <cstdlib>. Which platform? –  larsmans Jan 19 '12 at 23:28
    
Windows 7 x64 with MSVC++ 2010 (no need to include cstdlib in visual studio) –  codekiddy Jan 19 '12 at 23:29
    
Well, the program should be aborted unless the signal handlers does a longjmp. If you want the message to be printed before that, you might want to flush std::cout (or write to std::cerr). –  larsmans Jan 19 '12 at 23:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As others have said, you cannot have abort() return and allow execution to continue normally. What you can do however is protect a piece of code that might call abort by a structure akin to a try catch. Execution of the code will be aborted but the rest of the program can continue. Here is a demo:

#include <csetjmp>
#include <csignal>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>

jmp_buf env;

void on_sigabrt (int signum)
{
  longjmp (env, 1);
}

void try_and_catch_abort (void (*func)(void))
{
  if (setjmp (env) == 0) {
    signal(SIGABRT, &on_sigabrt);
    (*func)();
  }
  else {
    std::cout << "aborted\n";
  }
}


void do_stuff ()
{
  std::cout << "step 1\n";
  std::cout << "step 2\n";
}

void do_stuff_aborted ()
{
  std::cout << "step 1\n";
  abort();
  std::cout << "step 2\n";
}


int main()
{
  try_and_catch_abort (&do_stuff_aborted);
  try_and_catch_abort (&do_stuff);

  return 0;
}

Note:

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Although you can replace handler for SIGABRT and abort() will pay attention to the handler, the abort is only inhibited if the signal handler does not return. The relevant quote in C99 is in 7.20.4.1 paragraph 2:

The abort function causes abnormal program termination to occur, unless the signal SIGABRT is being caught and the signal handler does not return. ...

Your signal handler does return and thus the program is aborted.

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