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I need a type trait which will report the type of a functor's operator() parameter given the type of the functor and the type of an argument passed to it. Basically, I need to determine precisely what type the argument will be converted to when passing it to the functor. For simplicity, let's assume that I'm only interested in a (potentially templated, potentially overloaded) operator() with a single argument. Unfortunately, I'm limited to c++03. Can it be done? If not, how about c++11?

Here's one example:

#include <cassert>
#include <type_traits>

template<typename Functor, typename Argument>
  struct parameter_type
{
  // what goes here?
  typedef ... type;
};

struct takes_float_cref
{
  void operator()(const float &);
};

int main()
{
  // when calling takes_float_cref::operator() with an int,
  // i'd expect a conversion to const float &
  assert(std::is_same(parameter_type<takes_float_cref, int>::type, const float &>::value);

  return 0;
}

A related question (whose answer doesn't give me quite what I need) gives the context for needing such a trait. I've put further unit tests on ideone.

share|improve this question
    
Can you not simply add same typedef inside each functor? Something like typedef float const & TParameter; inside takes_float_cref and then just test for Functor::TParameter? – Petr Budnik Jan 20 '12 at 0:10
    
@AxxA, thank you for the suggestion. Yes, that's one solution, but I find it heavy-handed to require that of clients. I'm not sure it would scale well to the general case of N parameters. – Jared Hoberock Jan 20 '12 at 0:13
    
Well, actually it might not be that bad. It's too long to type here though, I'll post it as an answer. See if it helps you. – Petr Budnik Jan 20 '12 at 0:43
    
@AzzA: the main drawback is that functors that accept multiple types of parameters (templates or overload) cannot easily define such a typedef. – Matthieu M. Jan 20 '12 at 7:27
2  
+1 for a question with unit tests! – Matthieu M. Jan 20 '12 at 7:29

I am afraid that this is not exactly possible without help from your client.

TL;DR: unit test fail (grrr gcc).

The general case of your question is this functor:

struct Functor {
  template <typename T>
  typename std::enable_if<std::is_integral<T>::value>::type
  operator()(T t) const;

  void operator(double d) const;
};

It combines the two main issues here:

  1. If there is an overload, then taking &F::operator() requires a static_cast to a given type to disambiguate which overload should be used
  2. Templates (and arbitrary conditions to express them) cannot be succintly expressed as typedefs

Therefore, the client (Functor here) need to provide additional hooks for you if you truly wish to get this type. And without decltype I don't see how to get it (note, gcc provides typeof as an extension in C++03).

Getting the client to give us hints:

// 1. Make use of the return value:
struct Functor {
  template <typename T>
  typename std::enable_if<std::is_integral<T>::value, T>::type
  operator()(T t) const;

  double operator(double d) const;
};

// 2. Double up the work (but leave the return value as is)
struct Functor {
  template <typename T>
  static typename std::enable_if<std::is_integral<T>::value, T>::type Select(T);

  static double Select(T);

  template <typename T>
  typename std::enable_if<std::is_integral<T>::value>::type
  operator()(T t) const;

  void operator(double d) const;
};

Let's say we go for the second case (leaving the return value free for another use).

template <typename F, typename T>
struct parameter {
  static T t;
  typedef decltype(F::Select(t)) type;
};

In C++03, replace decltype by typeof with gcc.

I don't see a way to forego decltype. sizeof does provides an unevaluated context but it does not seem to help much here.

Unit Tests Here.

Unfortunately, there is a gcc bug it seems with the references, and float& gets reduced to float (and any other reference really), the bug remains with decltype so it's just a buggy implementation :/ Clang 3.0 has no problem with the C++11 version (decltype) but does not implement typeof I think.

This can be worked around by requiring the client to use a ref<float> class instead, and then unwrapping it. Just a bit more burden...

share|improve this answer
    
Note that one of the unit tests is apparently buggy: takes_float_cref's test is written as if it expects a bar const&. How would that ever pass? – Xeo Jan 20 '12 at 8:42
    
@Xeo: exact, the use of assert means we never go that far. I'll patch the test. – Matthieu M. Jan 20 '12 at 8:51
    
@Xeo: test patched, I've gone for compile-time failure and it shows that gcc just ignores the top level reference :x – Matthieu M. Jan 20 '12 at 8:55
    
@MatthieuM. Thanks! I'm not sure I understand what hint the client is giving me in your first example. (1. Make use of the return value) Can you explain? – Jared Hoberock Jan 20 '12 at 19:09
    
@JaredHoberock: if you can coerce the client into having its operator() returning the same as its parameter, then you can use that directly. This quite limits what is achievable (and does not pass your test case) so it's easier to ask him to duplicate its work and provide the "Select" overload. The only issue is that it might be more difficult for him to keep operator() and Select in sync... it's really far from perfect in either case :x – Matthieu M. Jan 20 '12 at 19:23

To get started I would go with this:

template<typename F>
struct parameter_type_impl;

// may be with variadic arguments
template<typename R, typename A, typename F>
struct parameter_type_impl<R (F::*)(A)> {
  typedef A type;
};

template<typename F>
struct parameter_type {
  typedef typename parameter_type_impl<decltype(&F::operator())>::type type;
};

I don't see why you would pass in the actual argument type. If the conversion is not able to take place you have to use special measures (e.g. SFINAE) later on. I think the two things are orthogonal: deducing the argument type, then deciding if the argument you would like to pass in is convertible.

The non-C++03 decltype is hard to get rid of. Specifying a function type always requires knowledge of the arguments. As soon as you would spell out the arguments, the whole thing would be moot.

The same problem would occur with Boost.Function Types.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks. I expect that I need to pass in the actual argument type to disambiguate which overload would be invoked, and also which potentially templated operator() would be instantiated. – Jared Hoberock Jan 20 '12 at 0:18
    
Oh, your question has nothing about overloads. If so, you already set sail for fail. Overloaded functions have always to be disambiguated by a static_cast which would always require you to spell out the type. So you also need to pass in the return type. This gets ugly very fast without C++11. – pmr Jan 20 '12 at 0:23
    
My bad. The code I posted on ideone makes it clear all the cases I'm interested in. Ugly I can deal with, I just want to know if it's possible or not :) – Jared Hoberock Jan 20 '12 at 0:28
    
Not to my knowledge. Given an overloaded function and an argument I don't know how to get the type of the function that would be called through template meta-programming. – pmr Jan 20 '12 at 0:33
    
@JaredHoberock Have a look at my attempt here: This doesn't solve your problem in anyway, though. stackoverflow.com/questions/8935520/… – pmr Jan 20 '12 at 1:02
    #include <iostream>

    template< typename PParameter00 = void, typename PParameter01 = void, typename PParameter02 = void, typename PParameter03 = void >
    struct TIdentityParameter // Users need to inherit from it. Add more types as needed.
    {
      typedef PParameter00 TType00;
      typedef PParameter01 TType01;
      typedef PParameter02 TType02;
      typedef PParameter03 TType03;
    };

    struct TUserFunctor00 : public TIdentityParameter< float const &, int, void * >
    {
      void operator()( float const &, int, void * );
      // or they can do
      //void operator()( TType00, TType01, TType02 );
    };

    struct TUserFunctor01 : public TIdentityParameter< char const *, double >
    {
      void operator()( char const*, double );
      // or they can do
      //void operator()( TType00, TType01 );
    };

    template< bool pValue >
    struct TValueBool
    {
      static bool const sValue = pValue;
    };

    template< typename PType00, typename PType01 >
    struct TIsSame : public TValueBool< false >
    {
    };

    template< typename PType >
    struct TIsSame< PType, PType > : public TValueBool< true >
    {
    };

    int main( void )
    {
     std::cout << TIsSame< TUserFunctor00::TType02, void * >::sValue << std::endl;
     std::cout << TIsSame< TUserFunctor01::TType00, double >::sValue << std::endl;

     return ( 0 );
    }

Code on [ideone][1]. I don't think it's asking too much from users to inherit from your struct in a pattern explained to them. After all, they want to work with your library. Anyway, maybe it's not what you are looking for.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

EDIT: Here is something, maybe, a bit closer to the functionality JAred is looking for, but, I understand, the style does not appeal to him. Although, within C++03, I don't see how you can do it differently. Note, you can make TIdentityParameter take, say 16 template arguments to cover 16 possible types. Once again, yes, user has to inherit and specify types. Ideone:

#include <iostream>

struct TOneCrazyStruct
{
};

template< typename PParameter00 = TOneCrazyStruct, typename PParameter01 = TOneCrazyStruct, typename PParameter02 = TOneCrazyStruct,
  typename PParameter03 = TOneCrazyStruct, typename PParameter04 = TOneCrazyStruct >
struct TIdentityParameter //Users will need to inherit from this struct as shown below.
{
  typedef PParameter00 TType00;
  typedef PParameter01 TType01;
  typedef PParameter02 TType02;
  typedef PParameter03 TType03;
  typedef PParameter04 TType04;
};

struct TUserFunctor00 : public TIdentityParameter< float const &, int, void *, double >
{
  void operator()( float const &, int, void * );
  void operator()( double );
};

template< bool pValue >
struct TValueBool
{
  static bool const sValue = pValue;
};

template< typename PType00, typename PType01 >
struct TIsSame : public TValueBool< false >
{
};

template< typename PType >
struct TIsSame< PType, PType > : public TValueBool< true >
{
};

template< typename PFunctor, typename PParameter >
struct THasType : public TValueBool<
  TIsSame< typename PFunctor::TType00, PParameter >::sValue || TIsSame< typename PFunctor::TType01, PParameter >::sValue
    || TIsSame< typename PFunctor::TType02, PParameter >::sValue || TIsSame< typename PFunctor::TType03, PParameter >::sValue >
{
};

int main( void )
{
 std::cout << THasType< TUserFunctor00, void * >::sValue << std::endl;
 std::cout << THasType< TUserFunctor00, long double >::sValue << std::endl;

 return ( 0 );
 }
share|improve this answer
    
So, why not just inherit from std::binary_function or std::unary_function and be done with it? This also doesn't cover overloads. – pmr Jan 20 '12 at 0:58
    
@AzzA Thanks for the suggestion, but as pmr notes, the whole reason for this exercise is to avoid this sort of thing. Moreover, c++11 deprecates std::unary_function and std::binary_function. – Jared Hoberock Jan 20 '12 at 1:01
    
@JaredHoberock Oh, well, sorry it didn't help. – Petr Budnik Jan 20 '12 at 1:08
    
@AzzA There is no n-arguments in C++03. (Well, the preprocessor is the limit.). For overloads: How would your base class handle a class with overloaded operator()? – pmr Jan 20 '12 at 1:08
    
@pmr Alright, I've posted slightly edited version. I understand, it's not something Jared is looking for, just to address your concerns. – Petr Budnik Jan 20 '12 at 1:23

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