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I have two enums that cross reference each other. Each one has a constructor that has a parameter for other enum.

They look something like:

SchoolEnum(ImmuneEnum value)
{
   this.immune = value;
}

ImmuneEnum(SchoolEnum value)
{
   this.school = value;
}

However depending on which Enum I call first, I can get a null value for the reference variable.

ImmunityEnum immune = ImmunityEnum.IMMUNE_KANNIC; 
SchoolEnum school = SchoolEnum.KANNIC;
System.out.println(school.getImmune())
System.out.println(immune.getSchool());

Produces the output: null Kannic

SchoolEnum school = SchoolEnum.KANNIC;
ImmunityEnum immune = ImmunityEnum.IMMUNE_KANNIC; 
System.out.println(school.getImmune())
System.out.println(immune.getSchool());

Produces the output: immunekannic null

It seems to be a bit of the "chicken and egg" problem as to when the enum is instantiated. But is there a way to have each one properly reference the other? I am considering making two singleton hashmaps that artificially cross reference the two, but is there a better idea?

share|improve this question
    
Enumerators? Constructors with constructors for the other? No enumerators, and the ctors don't "have ctors", they set an instance variable that references the other. You don't show where you construct them, but if each is a singleton with a reference to the other, might want to rethink the design--what's the actual relationship between the two? –  Dave Newton Jan 20 '12 at 1:18
    
I didn't mean to say each constructor has a constructor; I meant to say each constructor has a parameter. –  Robert Jan 20 '12 at 1:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What if you passing String parameters into your constructors:

public enum SchoolEnum {
   Kannic("immnunekannic");
   private String immune;
   public SchoolEnum (String immune) {this.immune = immune;}
   public ImmuneEnum getImmune() {
       return ImmuneEnum.valueOf(immune);
   }
}

public enum ImmnueEnum {
   immunekannic("Kannic");
   private String scholl;
   public ImmnueEnum (String school) {this.school = school;}
   public SchoolEnum getSchool() {
       return SchoolEnum.valueOf(school);
   }
}

But honestly it's a bit strange to create this type of domain model. What's your use case?

share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm, I tried this and it seems to work. I guess it avoids the circularity of my original constructors. Thanks! –  Robert Jan 20 '12 at 1:44
public enum SchoolEnum  {
  KANNIC {

    @Override
    public ImmunityEnum  getImmune() {
      return ImmunityEnum.IMMUNE_KANNIC;
    }
  };

  public abstract ImmunityEnum getImmune();
}

public enum ImmunityEnum {
  IMMUNE_KANNIC {

    @Override    
    public SchoolEnum getSchool() {
      return SchoolEnum.KANNIC;
    }
  };

  public abstract SchoolEnum getSchool();
}
share|improve this answer

It's not the prettiest solution in the world, but how about setting the cross-references afterwards?:

enum SchoolEnum {
    KANNIC;
    private ImmunityEnum immune;
    public ImmunityEnum getImmune() {
        return immune;
    }
    public void setImmune(ImmunityEnum immune) {
        this.immune = immune;
    }
}

enum ImmunityEnum {
    IMMUNE_KANNIC;
    private SchoolEnum school;
    public SchoolEnum getSchool() {
        return school;
    }
    public void setSchool(SchoolEnum school) {
        this.school = school;
    }
}

Now use it like this:

SchoolEnum school = SchoolEnum.KANNIC;
school.setImmune(ImmunityEnum.IMMUNE_KANNIC);
ImmunityEnum immune = ImmunityEnum.IMMUNE_KANNIC; 
immune.setSchool(SchoolEnum.KANNIC);

System.out.println(school.getImmune());
System.out.println(immune.getSchool());
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I was considering doing this as well. It probably would have been better than my Singleton hashmap idea. –  Robert Jan 20 '12 at 1:45

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