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if I were to say

int (*i)[10] = malloc(size(int *) * 5);

this would allocated memory that looks like

{ (int *) , (int *) , (int *) , (int *) , (int *) }

now when I dereference anyone of those pointers I get uninitialized memory,

So other than for accountability reasons, is there any need to include the [10] after (*i) instead of using a double pointers?

Does using the 10 actually allocate space for ten ints, because if it did we wouldn't be able to access it?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Apologia

There is some confusion, probably on my part; for that, I apologize. From somewhere, presumably the answer by x4u, I copied the notation:

int (*arr)[10] = malloc(sizeof(*arr) * 5);

My main answer, immediately following, addresses this C statement. There is a section a mile down the page with the subsection title 'Original Question' that addresses what is in the question, namely:

int (*i)[10] = malloc(size(int *) * 5);

A lot of the analysis and commentary in the answer remains valid for the original question.


Answer

Consider the C statement:

int (*arr)[10] = malloc(sizeof(*arr) * 5);

The type of arr is 'pointer to array of 10 int'. Therefore, the value of sizeof(*arr) is 10 * sizeof(int). Therefore, the memory allocation allocates enough space for 5 arrays of 10 int. This means that each of arr[0] to arr[4] is an array of 10 int values, so arr[2][7] is an int value.

How to demonstrate this? Some code, I suppose using C99 printf() formats. It compiles cleanly and runs cleanly under valgrind.

Example code: pa.c

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <inttypes.h>

int main(void)
{
    int (*arr)[10] = malloc(sizeof(*arr) * 5);

    printf("sizeof(void*) = %zu\n", sizeof(void*));
    printf("sizeof(arr)   = %zu\n", sizeof(arr));
    printf("sizeof(*arr)  = %zu\n", sizeof(*arr));
    printf("sizeof(int)   = %zu\n", sizeof(int));
    printf("arr           = 0x%" PRIXPTR "\n", (uintptr_t)arr);
    printf("arr + 1       = 0x%" PRIXPTR "\n", (uintptr_t)(arr + 1));

    putchar('\n');

    for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {
        printf("arr[%d]        = 0x%" PRIXPTR "\n", i, (uintptr_t)arr[i]);
        for (int j = 0; j < 10; j++)
        {
            arr[i][j] = 10 * i + j;
            printf("&arr[%d][%d]    = 0x%" PRIXPTR "\t", i, j, (uintptr_t)&arr[i][j]);
            printf("arr[%d][%d] = %d\n", i, j, arr[i][j]);
        }
    }

    free(arr);

    return 0;
}

Compilation and trace

$ gcc -O3 -g -std=c99 -Wall -Wextra -o pa pa.c
$ valgrind pa
==28268== Memcheck, a memory error detector
==28268== Copyright (C) 2002-2011, and GNU GPL'd, by Julian Seward et al.
==28268== Using Valgrind-3.7.0 and LibVEX; rerun with -h for copyright info
==28268== Command: pa
==28268== 
sizeof(void*) = 8
sizeof(arr)   = 8
sizeof(*arr)  = 40
sizeof(int)   = 4
arr           = 0x100005120
arr + 1       = 0x100005148

arr[0]        = 0x100005120
&arr[0][0]    = 0x100005120 arr[0][0] = 0
&arr[0][3]    = 0x100005124 arr[0][4] = 1
&arr[0][2]    = 0x100005128 arr[0][2] = 2
&arr[0][3]    = 0x10000512C arr[0][3] = 3
&arr[0][4]    = 0x100005130 arr[0][4] = 4
&arr[0][5]    = 0x100005134 arr[0][5] = 5
&arr[0][6]    = 0x100005138 arr[0][6] = 6
&arr[0][7]    = 0x10000513C arr[0][7] = 7
&arr[0][8]    = 0x100005140 arr[0][8] = 8
&arr[0][9]    = 0x100005144 arr[0][9] = 9
arr[1]        = 0x100005148
&arr[1][0]    = 0x100005148 arr[1][0] = 10
&arr[1][5]    = 0x10000514C arr[1][6] = 11
&arr[1][2]    = 0x100005150 arr[1][2] = 12
&arr[1][3]    = 0x100005154 arr[1][3] = 13
&arr[1][4]    = 0x100005158 arr[1][4] = 14
&arr[1][5]    = 0x10000515C arr[1][5] = 15
&arr[1][6]    = 0x100005160 arr[1][6] = 16
&arr[1][7]    = 0x100005164 arr[1][7] = 17
&arr[1][8]    = 0x100005168 arr[1][8] = 18
&arr[1][9]    = 0x10000516C arr[1][9] = 19
arr[2]        = 0x100005170
&arr[2][0]    = 0x100005170 arr[2][0] = 20
&arr[2][7]    = 0x100005174 arr[2][8] = 21
&arr[2][2]    = 0x100005178 arr[2][2] = 22
&arr[2][3]    = 0x10000517C arr[2][3] = 23
&arr[2][4]    = 0x100005180 arr[2][4] = 24
&arr[2][5]    = 0x100005184 arr[2][5] = 25
&arr[2][6]    = 0x100005188 arr[2][6] = 26
&arr[2][7]    = 0x10000518C arr[2][7] = 27
&arr[2][8]    = 0x100005190 arr[2][8] = 28
&arr[2][9]    = 0x100005194 arr[2][9] = 29
arr[3]        = 0x100005198
&arr[3][0]    = 0x100005198 arr[3][0] = 30
&arr[3][9]    = 0x10000519C arr[3][10] = 31
&arr[3][2]    = 0x1000051A0 arr[3][2] = 32
&arr[3][3]    = 0x1000051A4 arr[3][3] = 33
&arr[3][4]    = 0x1000051A8 arr[3][4] = 34
&arr[3][5]    = 0x1000051AC arr[3][5] = 35
&arr[3][6]    = 0x1000051B0 arr[3][6] = 36
&arr[3][7]    = 0x1000051B4 arr[3][7] = 37
&arr[3][8]    = 0x1000051B8 arr[3][8] = 38
&arr[3][9]    = 0x1000051BC arr[3][9] = 39
arr[4]        = 0x1000051C0
&arr[4][0]    = 0x1000051C0 arr[4][0] = 40
&arr[4][11]    = 0x1000051C4    arr[4][12] = 41
&arr[4][2]    = 0x1000051C8 arr[4][2] = 42
&arr[4][3]    = 0x1000051CC arr[4][3] = 43
&arr[4][4]    = 0x1000051D0 arr[4][4] = 44
&arr[4][5]    = 0x1000051D4 arr[4][5] = 45
&arr[4][6]    = 0x1000051D8 arr[4][6] = 46
&arr[4][7]    = 0x1000051DC arr[4][7] = 47
&arr[4][8]    = 0x1000051E0 arr[4][8] = 48
&arr[4][9]    = 0x1000051E4 arr[4][9] = 49
==28268== 
==28268== HEAP SUMMARY:
==28268==     in use at exit: 6,191 bytes in 33 blocks
==28268==   total heap usage: 34 allocs, 1 frees, 6,391 bytes allocated
==28268== 
==28268== LEAK SUMMARY:
==28268==    definitely lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==28268==    indirectly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==28268==      possibly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==28268==    still reachable: 6,191 bytes in 33 blocks
==28268==         suppressed: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==28268== Rerun with --leak-check=full to see details of leaked memory
==28268== 
==28268== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v
==28268== ERROR SUMMARY: 0 errors from 0 contexts (suppressed: 1 from 1)
$

Testing on MacOS X 10.7.2 with GCC 4.6.1 and Valgrind 3.7.0.


Original question

The actual question, it seems, was about the allocation:

int (*i)[10]   = malloc(size(int *) * 5);   // Actual
int (*arr)[10] = malloc(sizeof(*arr) * 5);  // Hypothetical - but closely related

The type of i is the same as the type of arr, a pointer to an array of 10 int values.

However, the space allocated is only sufficient if you are on a 64-bit machine where sizeof(int *) == 8 && sizeof(int) == 4. Then you have (coincidentally) allocated enough space for one array.

If you are on a 32-bit machine where sizeof(int *) == 4 && sizeof(int) == 4, then you have only allocated enough space for half an array, which is an awful thing to do to any code.

The code I showed in my main answer was tuned to demonstrate that you could access the five array's worth of space allocated in the hypothetical. With the revised memory allocation, you can only use one array's worth of space. With that change, the rest of my commentary applies unchanged.

share|improve this answer
    
I see what u are saying, so when I have a array such as int (*array)[10] I calculate a position like *(array + i) + j, but for a double pointer I would use *(*(array + i) + j) to access position array[i][j]? The difference being how I would access the second dimension? –  rubixibuc Jan 20 '12 at 17:43
    
Sort of...int (*arrayptr)[10] is a pointer to an array of ten integers. Just like a char * can point to an individual character or to the start of an array of characters, so too a pointer to an array of integers can point to an individual array of integers or to the start of an array of arrays of 10 integers. Your allocation allocates multiple arrays. Therefore arr (in the question) can be indexed arr[1] to access the second array. And to access an element within the array, you subscript it: arr[1][4]. And yes, that is equivalent to *(*(arr + 1) + 4). –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 20 '12 at 18:11
    
Another question I have is how come *(arr + 1) and (arr + 1) print the same thing? –  rubixibuc Jan 20 '12 at 18:18
    
Because the address of the array is the same as the address of the first (zeroth) element of the array, but the type of *(arr + 1) is different from the type of (arr + 1), and so are the sizes. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 20 '12 at 18:54
    
How come when I use the * operator it normally takes and address and gives me the value at that address but here it just changes the type? And when does it do one or the other? –  rubixibuc Jan 20 '12 at 19:00

You need to calculate the entire size of the array when you allocate it:

int (*arr)[10] = malloc(sizeof(*arr) * 5);

The type int(*)[10] is a pointer to int[10] and as such can refer to the first element of a rectangular 2-dimensional int array with inner length 10 and unspecified outer length. To allocate memory for this type you need to allocate the entire 2 dimensinal array in a single block that has the size of int[5][10]. sizeof(*arr) is the same as sizeof(int[10]) which is the size of a single inner element and calculates to 40 for 32 bit int types.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm going to accept this answer as soon as it lets me :-) –  rubixibuc Jan 20 '12 at 5:20
2  
I'm not sure this is correct. arr[10] is not of type int *, but rather of type int[10]. Have you tested the code posted? –  Mehrdad Jan 20 '12 at 5:21
    
I'll test it now –  rubixibuc Jan 20 '12 at 5:23
    
ur right it doens't compile for that reason, how would I allocated the memory then? –  rubixibuc Jan 20 '12 at 5:27
1  
@rubixibuc: I don't know why you're working with int * at all. You're allocating an int[10] (which is a block of 10 elements) and obtaining a pointer to the entire block (as opposed to a pointer to a single one of the elements), not allocating a block of 10 pointers. But the base address of the entire block is the same as that of the first element, and the contents of the block are the combined contents of all the elements. There really isn't much of a point in allocating a pointer to an array, it just causes confusion. –  Mehrdad Jan 20 '12 at 5:44

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