Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have been doing some testing with the following code to try and workout how ActionFilterAttributes work:

public class TestAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    private string _privateValue;
    public string PublicValue { get; set; }

    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
        _privateValue = DateTime.Now.ToString();

        base.OnActionExecuting(filterContext);
    }
}

When I run the above code on two parallel threads the _privateValue field gets confused. However the PublicValue property doesn't get confused.

It looks to me like ActionFilterAttributes are reused across threads, but that new instances are created depending on the constants specified to public properties. Am I correct?

Where can I find information on this?

share|improve this question
up vote 47 down vote accepted

This will depend on the version of ASP.NET MVC but you should never store instance state in an action filter that will be reused between the different methods. Here's a quote for example from one of the breaking changes in ASP.NET MVC 3:

In previous versions of ASP.NET MVC, action filters are create per request except in a few cases. This behavior was never a guaranteed behavior but merely an implementation detail and the contract for filters was to consider them stateless. In ASP.NET MVC 3, filters are cached more aggressively. Therefore, any custom action filters which improperly store instance state might be broken.

This basically means that the same instance of the action filter can be reused for different actions and if you have stored instance state in it it will probably break.

And in terms of code this means that you should absolutely never write an action filter like this:

public class TestAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    private string _privateValue;

    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
        _privateValue = ... some calculation
    }

    public override void OnActionExecuted(ActionExecutedContext filterContext)
    {
        // use _privateValue here
    }
}

but you should write it like this:

public class TestAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
        var privateValue = ... some calculation
        filterContext.HttpContext.Items["__private_value__"] = privateValue;
    }

    public override void OnActionExecuted(ActionExecutedContext filterContext)
    {
        var privateValue = filterContext.HttpContext.Items["__private_value__"];
        // use privateValue safely here
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
What about the public properties of an Action Filter (e.g. OutputCache's Duration property)? I assume that a new instance is created if the property is different. – cbp Jan 20 '12 at 7:37
1  
Fine, but then how can OutputCache (which is an action filter) have public properties such as Duration, CacheProfile, VaryByCustom etc.? – cbp Jan 21 '12 at 4:09
1  
@cbp, there is nothing wrong from having instance fields (private or public) on an action filter. It's the way you are using them inside that you should be extremely careful about. – Darin Dimitrov Jan 21 '12 at 7:50
1  
OK but if the ActionFilter gets reused in parallel wouldn't there be the potential for the value of the public properties to be unreliable? For example, using my code above, if two actions execute at the same time - one that sets PublicValue to "a", and one that sets PublicValue to "b" - I would have to be confident that two instances of TestAttribute were created, otherwise I could not rely on the value of PublicValue, no matter how I'm planning on using it. What would be the point of even having public properties if you could never rely on their state being correct for a particular action? – cbp Jan 21 '12 at 10:20
2  
@cbp, in your case you have 2 different actions because on the first you set PublicValue to "a" and on the second you set it to "b". There's no problem in this case because action filters are attributes and attributes are metadata in .NET and metadata is associated to a particular member at compile time. You could encounter problems if it is for the same action and you try to reuse the values of your instance field between the different methods OnActionExecuting, OnActionExecuted, ... – Darin Dimitrov Jan 21 '12 at 10:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.